Glass artists in the RMG Shop

The RMG Shop features creations by local artisans and artists. We’ll be profiling these artists and introducing them to you. For the second instalment, we’re featuring two glass artists. Visit the shop to purchase one of these unique items!

glass casting

Angela Legere casting glass at Sheridan College. Photo courtesy of Angela Legere.

Angela Legere is a glass artist from Oshawa, Ontario.  She is currently in her final year of the Craft and Design Program at Sheridan Collage where her major is in glass casting and kiln forming. Angela enjoys making functional objects although her main focus is body casting and working with the female form.  Angela is looking forward to embarking on her new career.

After three years of exploring glass making in various forms, Angela has found a passion for mold making. Most of her studio time is spent in the sand casting area or kiln casting room preparing molds and learning about new materials. She enjoys making functional objects although her main focus is body casting and working with the female form.

jewellery

Rhonda Davey’s jewellery in the RMG Shop. Photo by Alex Ross.

Rhonda Davey has been a creative artistic person, making handmade items since her youth. She finds it very rewarding seeing a finished item after spending hours coming up with the idea, figuring out what materials to use and then completing the task.

When she was young, she worked with her grandfather in his workshop building furniture. She was in grade school when she started to make her own jewellery. In her jewellery design she uses a combination of glass and acrylic beads with semi-precious stones, memory wire, beading wire and chain. She finds inspiration from nature and architecture.

Her passion is working with stained glass to design unique panels and sun catchers. She was inspired by stained glass church windows and wanted to learn what goes into making them. She uses the copper foil technique, which involves each piece of glass to be hand cut, the edges are smoothed with a grinder and copper foil is wrapped around each piece. It is then laid out on the paper pattern and soldered together.
Whether she is painting or working with glass, all of her pieces have been hand crafted with attention to detail and high quality materials.

Museum Month: Visit our Neighbourhood Museums

In celebration of Museum Month, we’re shining a spotlight on the other galleries and museums around Oshawa and the Durham Region.

The Whitby Station Gallery and the Visual Arts Centre of Clarington also play important roles in the cultural community of Durham Region. The Oshawa Community Museum and Archives(OCMA), Parkwood Estate, the Canadian Automotive Museum and the Ontario Regiment RCAC Museum are sharing the cultural history of Durham Region.

The Oshawa Community Museum and Archives:

OCMA

Oshawa Community Museum and Archives, Guy House.
Photo courtesy of the OCMA

The Oshawa Community Museum and Archives works to preserve and present Oshawa’s history and help the public better understand and appreciate the City’s heritage. The OCMA tells Oshawa’s story from the first native settlements and to the present day.

The OCMA holds a photograph collection from Thomas Bouckley, artifacts from the Henry, Robinson and Guy families, a medical instrument collection and vast artifact and photograph collection showing historic Oshawa. The Oshawa Historical Society administers the OCMA to ensure all funding received from the City of Oshawa goes to support the operation and administration of the OCMA.

The OCMA is a leader in promoting Oshawa’s history and connecting people and communities with their past. Now that the weather has gotten nicer the Heritage Gardens are perfect place to go to enjoy the history behind some of Oshawa.

Parkwood Estate:

Parkwood

Parkwood Estate, Oshawa.
Photo courtesy of Parkwood Estates.

Parkwood Estate is a mansion located in the heart of Oshawa, decorated in classic period representation of the early 20th century design. The rooms are made to highlight the lifestyle of a wealthy family and their guests. The collection is so complete it gives an impression that the family still lives there!

In 1915, the McLaughlin family had gained notability and achieved “First Family” status in Oshawa. They purchased Prospect Park to be the site of their new home, Parkwood Estate. The mansion was designed by Darling and Pearson, a team of architects who had a large influence on Canadian institutional architecture. The mansion began construction in 1915 and finished in 1917.

The gardens around the house provide an elaborate distraction for families and visitors to the estate. Parkwood Estate offers an opportunity to see the last and finest remaining residential gardens designed by Harries & Hall, Dunington-Grubb and John Lyle.

Whitby Station Gallery:

Whitby Station Gallery

Train car outside the Whitby Station Gallery.
Photo courtesy of the Whitby Station Gallery.

The Whitby Station Gallery started as a community gallery run by a group of art enthusiasts in Whitby as Whitby Arts Incorporated. The group, along with benefactors and supporters, purchased Whitby’s Grand Trunk Railway Station in 1969. The station was set to be demolished, but the purchase by the group saved the building and it was moved in 1970 and given the name Whitby Station Gallery.

The gallery’s permanent collection houses more than 300 original pieces, including works by Anne Meredith Barry, David Blackwood and Kim Ondaatje. The gallery is also about to start its SG Pop-up Studio, which brings free art experiences to events in the community. The events start on the weekend of May 14 at the Food Truck Frenzy in the Iroquois Park Sports Centre and Artfest on the Esplanade in Pickering.

Visual Arts Centre of Clarington:

Old VAC

The original Mill that was later turned into the Visual Arts Centre.
Photo courtesy of the VAC.

In 1973, the town of Bowmanville purchased the Mill, a historic landmark of Bowmanville with rich history, and council agreed to turn the building into a Visual Arts Centre (VAC). Mills were seen as a life source for towns in the past, and now that hasn’t changed, except the type of life it brings to the town. The VAC still brings life to the community in the form of art, something that most people didn’t have the luxury in taking part of in the past.

The VAC of Clarington is located along Soper Creek, along a path through the Rotary Centennial Gardens and along the Soper Valley. The VAC is currently exhibiting Maralynn Cherry’s Water Stations (a pilgrimage). Cherry is a non-status indigenous artists of Odawa heritage.

Ontario Regiment RCAC Museum:

CVRT Scorpion

A CVRT Scorpion on display at the Ontario Regiment RCAC Museum.
Photo courtesy of the Ontario Regiment RCAC Museum.

The Ontario Regiment RCAC Museum is home to Canada’s largest collection of operational military vehicles. They host a program called ‘Tank Sundays’ which lets visitors of all ages experience the world of tanks first hand.

The museum also hosts a static display to display their collection, including medals, manuscripts, photos, uniforms and more. The display tells the story of the Ontario Regiments 150 year history, spanning through the World Wars, the Cold War and modern times. The museum also focuses on the Militia’s evolution from the early 19th century, while highlighting the historical relationship between the industrial development of Oshawa, General Motors, and the Regiment.

Canadian Automotive Museum:

Old CAM

The historic Canadian Automotive Museum.
Photo courtesy of the CAM.

The Canadian Automotive Museum maintains a former car dealership from 1921 at 99 Simcoe St. South. While the main floor holds mostly European vehicles, the second floor keeps the history of automotive manufacturing in Canada. The museum is also home to an extensive library, and a lot for drive-ins and car shows.

The CAM currently has the European Masterpieces from the McDougald Collection on display on the main floor and the Cars Built in Canada – 1900-1980 exhibit on the second floor. Also the exhibit A Rolls-Royce for Royalty: Canadian Aristocracy after the Great War opened on May 5. The exhibit shows the story behind the 1914 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost, the vehicle Edward, Prince of Wales used during his 1919 Royal Tour of Canada.

Mother’s Day is around the corner

In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation for Mother’s Day, designating the second Sunday of May to be a national holiday. Since then, we have celebrated over 100 years of moms taking care of us 24/7, since we were born.

If you are looking to give back to your mother for all she has helped you with, join the over 80 countries who will celebrate Mother’s Day on the second Sunday of May.

To help repay some of the debt you owe to your mother consider taking her out for a Mother’s Day brunch on May 8th. Hosted by the RMG in Arthur’s on the 4th with catering provided by Pilar’s Catering. There will be two seatings at 10:30am and 12:30pm. Reservations are required, email [email protected] to secure your spot.

Arthurs of the 4th

Photo by Brilynn Ferguson

There will be an assortment of fresh pastries and baked goods along with a variety of options for meals and a dessert buffet to follow.

Along with the brunch, we have our regularly scheduled OPG Second Sunday with a special Mother’s Day theme. Children will be creating a unique tile mosaic, a beautiful card and gift wrap for the special person in their lives.

There is no reservation required for OPG Second Sundays, just drop by the RMG from 1pm to 3pm.

mom and kid

Now let’s talk gifts for mom!

Don’t forget to stop by the RMG Shop before May 8 to check out some of these, and more, unique locally made gifts for the special lady in your life including:

kitchen

Some new supplies for culinary endeavors.

oz

One of these handmade Wizard of Oz themed editions by Kelly Grace.

beauty

Some of these fantastic body products by Aide Bodycare.

Canadiana

Or a great Canadian product for your Canadian mom.

Make sure to treat your mom extra special on May 8 and the rest of the year too! Don’t forget about Father’s Day on June 19! The RMG Shop has plenty of locally made dad-friendly gifts.

Victoria’s Co-op at the RMG

My name is Victoria Orjalo, and I am a Grade 12 student at Monsignor Paul Dwyer. I picked the RMG to do my Co-op placement because I am interested in studying and teaching art and am an aspiring artist. The RMG is the perfect fit and I am very fortunate to be a Gallery Studio Co-op student. Here five days a week, I have absorbed the extraordinary effort put into the Gallery Studio and school programs. I enjoy the incredible dedication of staff bringing joy to clay, watercolour and acrylic classes, as well as the fun school programs that includes a studio activity and a gallery tour. While working here I’ve helped children create art, worked on databases, done event setup and gained a deeper understanding of principals and fundamentals of art.

One of my favourite jobs is designing and constructing the event board for OPG Second Sundays and other family events. Each board has a different theme and I get the responsibility of designing them. My favourite board that I have done would have to be the Valentine’s Day Event board, which I designed based on the old styled handmade Valentine’s Day cards. The most satisfying part is the creative freedom and the enthusiastic reaction from people seeing it.

I have learned important life skills such as multitasking under pressure, working with children of all ages and being an engaging speaker. The studio is a great space for comical and creative thinkers. Having the opportunity to be behind the scenes of an art gallery has made me even more excited to start a career in art.

My experience at the RMG has been fantastic. The staff is passionate and are amazing to be around. Anyone thinking of doing a Co-op program should definitely check it out.

Victoria Orjalo

Victoria Orjalo

 

Experiencing the RMG through Inartistic Eyes

Samantha Pender is a Durham College public relations student completing her winter placement at the RMG as a communications intern.

 

Before I came to the RMG as a communications intern, I admittedly knew very little in the way of art. Being artistically challenged myself, I had never thought to explore art before coming here. But taking one look around the gallery immediately changed my thinking about art and how to appreciate it, despite lacking my own artistic skills.

Being a communications intern, I don’t get to spend much of my time looking through the galleries of the RMG. When I have been able to sneak away, however, I am always taken aback by the art surrounding me. While looking at the manipulated art and beautifully shot landscapes from Holly King, the wondrous abstract of Painters 11, and the many other different kinds of art throughout the RMG, I realized that you don’t really need to know that much about art to appreciate it.

Yes, understanding the style, medium or perspective of the artist can be helpful, but when it comes down to it, art is art. It’s a beautiful and absurd peak into the creative mind of a talented soul, and that is something I won’t be overlooking again.

Interning at the RMG has opened my mind to many things, not just the beauty of art. Researching content for Museum Week, was able to catch a glimpse into the history of Oshawa and see the familiar streets of today as an almost completely different town in black and white. I learned about architecture and came to appreciate different aspects of a building, something I knew nothing about. My supervisor, Sam, broadened my horizons by instilling the importance of learning things outside my comfort zone, something not to be taken for granted.

Working for a non-profit organization so deeply rooted in the community has been a great experience for me, as giving back to the community is something I care very much about. Seeing how the RMG dedicates so much time to the community through RMG Fridays – I worked on the RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary – as well as weekend family activities like OPG Second Sundays has only grown my love and appreciation for the gallery over the past three months.

Samantha Pender, 'Ronnie the Bren Gun Girl' from the Other NFB

Samantha Pender, RMG Communications Intern, with ‘Ronnie the Bren Gun Girl’ from the Other NFB

Kids can learn something new at the RMG!

At the RMG, learning never stops! With school winding down, it’s time to start thinking about how to keep young minds at home staying sharp! Fret not, the RMG has you and those sharp minds covered. With tons of art classes and camps, the toughest choice you’ll have is which ones to enroll your kids in!

Our Summer Camps will be the highlight of any kid’s summer, straying from traditional camp activities to explore creativity and give kids a great opportunity to indulge in a new level of arts and crafts! Here’s what we’ve got in store this Summer!

Are you looking to keep your tiny ones busy for a little bit, out of the house? Check out our Mini Summer Art Camp for Tots! For ages 2-4, running from August 2-5, from 9:30am to 10:30am Indulge your tiny tot’s creativity at the RMG, and who knows, you might end up raising the next Picasso! There’s only one way to find out!

mothers and babies

With many parents still at work while their kids are enjoying summer break, the RMG has already thought up a way to keep your kids busy, creative and having a blast while you work! Summer Art Camp for ages 5-10 is the perfect place for kids to have fun this summer. There are plenty of options to accommodate parent’s busy schedules, with half days (9am to 12:30pm or 1pm to 4:30pm) and full days (9am to 4:30pm), parents can customize their kids day, depending on their schedule. For parents who need a little extra time before and after camp, we also offer pre- and post-camp options, where we will gladly keep your kids entertained from 8am to 9am and from 4:30pm to 5:30pm. There are five different camps, four days long, with themes ranging from Play All day to Mixed Media Mayhem. There’s something for every kid to enjoy!

two girls

When the kids get a day off school, you won’t have to worry about what to do with them this spring! The RMG has P.A. Day camps for kids aged 5-10, that run from 9am to 4pm. The camps coincide with all Durham District School Board (DDSB) and Durham Catholic District School Board (DCDSB) P.A. Days (April 8 DDSB, April 15 DCDSB, June 3 DDSB) and encourage creative learning and activities so your kids can get a day off school, but their minds will keep going!

art camp

Are you hoping to give your teen or pre-teen something more stimulating to do than hanging out at the mall all summer? Well, we’ve got you covered for that, too! With our Pre-teen and Teen Summer Camp for kids aged 10-14, from August 2-5 from 1pm to 4pm, we offer your teens a glimpse of what it’s like to work in an art gallery! They will also have the opportunity to lead workshops while learning art techniques and making socially conscious art projects. This camp will keep your pre-teens mind fresh and stimulate thinking outside of the box while encouraging them to share their ideas and skills. It’s the perfect camp to get their minds ready for school in the fall!

The RMG also has plenty of weekly art classes this spring for kids of all ages. From P.A. days to homeschoolers, we’ve got everyone covered to kick off the closing of the school year and get kids excited to be creative this summer!

For tiny ones aged 2-4, Art Tots is a fun way to break normal routine and engage your kid’s mind in a different kind of creativity! Drop in with your family on Tuesday from now until May 10, 10:30am to 11am.

We know young kids like to have fun, but we also know they need enriching activities to keep their brains strong. That’s why Art FUNdamentals for Kids is the perfect art class for your 5-10 year old this spring! From April 2 – May 28, drop your kids off on Saturdays for 10am to 12pm or 1pm to 3pm for a super fun and informative learning experience! Your little Van Gough or Da Vinci will thank you later!

young boy

If your kids are homeschooled, it’s not always easy to come up with educational and stimulating art projects at home. So why not incorporate the RMG into your homeschool curriculum! Our Homeschool Art Classes run from 10:15am to 11:15am on Tuesdays from now until May 10, and offer a fun way to give your kids the attention of homeschooling while interacting on a creative level at an actual art gallery! How much fun is it to run art class in a gallery? Your kids will be thrilled and your home curriculum will be elevated!

So if you’re looking for enriching, educational and super fun spring classes or summer camps, look no further! The RMG is your one stop shop for your artsy kids. Visit Learn & Participate for a full list of art classes and camps, details and pricing, or call us at (905) 576-3000 for more information. Can’t wait to see you all this summer!

Expand your mind at the RMG!

While the RMG is full of art classes and camps for kids, we haven’t forgotten about parents and adults! The gallery invites art enthusiasts of all ages – young and old – to learn something new with us! Our adult classes range from artistic to physical, and we’re positive you’ll find something that strikes your interest.

If you feel like winding down after a busy day, the RMG knows just what you need! Yoga in the Gallery is the perfect way to calm your nerves and settle your mind after a long and busy Thursday at work. Meg Cox, our zen-tastic instructor, opens the class up to people of all levels, from beginners to seasoned yogis. With her down to earth and approachable attitude, and the beautiful art surrounding you in the Isabel McLaughlin Gallery, anyone can feel welcome and relaxed in our spacious yoga studio – and what better studio than an art gallery? The current session is running until April 21, with drop ins welcome, and the next session will be starting on May 5, and running until June 23.

yoga instructor

Changing pace, we are offering a different kind of class dynamic with Open Studio Mondays. Starting May 2 and running until June 27, our studio will be open from 10am to 4pm for artists who are encouraged to bring their own materials and work independently and freely in an open studio space.

art studio

We are also hoping to expand your mind, create inner peace and connect you with the deeper parts of yourself with Mindfulness Mondays, a six week course starting May 9 and running until June 20 from 12pm to 1pm. With Randi-Mae Stanford-Leibold, explore meditation and reflective writing using inspiration from the gallery. This is a great opportunity to slow things down and take a minute for yourself.

We have a number of exciting and unique workshops coming in spring and summer. These workshops are a great place for beginners to learn some new techniques and for artists to finesse their skills.

On Sunday, May 29, join us for Found Drawings with artist Ruth Read from 1pm to 3pm. Using various found materials, this workshop focuses on serendipitous artwork – art that happens by accident. This unique approach to art will stimulate your creativity and challenge you to look at art from different perspectives, as well as encourage you to work harmoniously and collaboratively with other artists to stumble upon some found imagery.

art installation

Ruth Read; The Garden in Winter

A couple weeks later on Sunday, June 12 at the same time, we have another intriguing workshop, Cartography of Process with Jessica Field, which hones in the theory of creativity, helping artists examine their creative process and make the most of their artwork.

If you’re looking for a mini camp experience for yourself, from August 15-19, the RMG has an exciting NEW opportunity for 19+ artists, Intro to Video! Without any experience necessary, we will teach you the basics of video and film making so you can be on your way to the next big film festival!

This spring and summer, the RMG is the creative mind’s oasis! You can relax with yoga, open your mind with mindfulness courses, and learn some awesome new artistic skills! It’s everything the creative bug in you could want and more! For more information, call us at (905) 576-3000 or visit for a full list of everything happening at the RMG!

The IRIS Group – Q & A with Founder, Margaret Rodgers

The IRIS Group will be exhibiting in Gallery A from March 2-27. Prior to their exhibition, IRIS at 20, we sat down with member Margaret Rodgers to tell us more about the the collective and upcoming projects.

Margaret Rodgers is an accomplished, Oshawa-based artist, with an international exhibition history. She is also founder of the IRIS Group – a collective of women artists – formerly an art professor at Durham and Centennial Colleges, and Director/Curator at VAC Clarington. She is the author of Locating Alexandra (Toronto: ECW, 1995) about Painters Eleven artist Alexandra Luke, and is published in venues including OshaWhat, Art and Ecology, Sculpture, Urban Glass, Canadian Art, ESPACE, and the Journal of Canadian Studies. She was a member of Heritage Oshawa for several years, and during that time worked on DOORS OPEN and organized Heritage Week events at Oshawa Centre. She is currently a member of Oshawa’s Cultural Leadership Council. @RodgersMargaret

Margaret Rodgers

Margaret Rodgers, 1976-2016, Mixed media on canvas, 91.4 X 87.6 CM, 2016

 

The RMG: Hi Margaret! Please tell us a bit about the IRIS Group.

Margaret Rodgers: The IRIS Group is a collective of women artists. It began in 1996 as a forum to share ideas, offer mutual support, and develop projects that further the overall intentions of the group. Based in Durham Region, IRIS has exhibited work and mounted outreach projects in galleries and on campuses in Ontario, Alberta, New York State and Mexico.

The IRIS Group

Filmic – The IRIS Group

RMG: What project is the IRIS group most proud of developing together?

MR: I think that our International Women’s Day events have to be the most exciting of our many projects since the group emerged. We even chose to highlight them for our 20 Year celebration! We collected objects and writings, as well as took head shots of women, inviting their comments on whatever they wanted. Some are very funny, others touching and eloquent. I documented these in two books that can be downloaded on our IRIS website.


RMG: What are some examples of current collaborations?

MR: Most recently, we worked together on “the Secret Garden” at YWCA Durham with the help of residents there, and through a city grant as well as Artsvest sponsorships from Oshawa businesses, we were able facilitate our activities. Last spring we exhibited together for FILMIC at Station Gallery Whitby, and the previous fall we participated in Nuit Blanche.

The most current is IRIS at 20. This March in Gallery A at the RMG, two of our members Janice Taylor-Prebble and Laura M. Hair have created a fabulous installation to feature the objects that we collected during the IWD events. The show will also include new works by several of us that riff on the objects, and I will have a projection of all those women that posed for us over our ten events.

iris group

The IRIS Group

RMG: What is the best thing about working within a collective?

MR: I am constantly amazed at the ideas that we develop collaboratively and the way that individual talents merge and support each other. I think that a collective has a better chance to thrive artistically through strength in numbers. A few years ago, we mounted projections of our work on the sides of buildings – something not one of us could have done individually.

For more Information please visit www.theirisgroup.ca

This article was originally published in the Culture Counts e-newsletter on February 9, 2016. It has been adapted for the RMG’s blog.

RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary – What a Night!

Samantha Pender is a second year Public Relations student at Durham College and is completing her first communications placement at the Robert McLaughlin Gallery this winter. 

 

Now that RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary has come and gone and all the excitement has wound down for the week, I can finally look back at the awesome night we had.

With so much going on, from musicians to dancers to Museum Hack, just to name a few, it’s hard to pick my favourite moment. So instead of choosing just one amazing moment from the night that stood out, I’m going to reminisce about a few of my favourite parts from the RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary.

RMG Fridays

RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary. Photo by Linda Ryde.

The two musicians, Annie Sumi and Jamie Drake, captivated almost everyone in the gallery. The gallery was packed with so many people; I couldn’t even squeeze in to get pictures. To see everyone enjoying the music and back up dancers from O’Neill was so amazing.

Speaking of the dancers, the O’Neill Senior Dance Ensemble nailed their performance as they kicked off the night. Everyone was mesmerized and it was so awesome to see that level of synchronization and talent. I was pleasantly surprised to see different members of the ensemble dancing in place throughout the gallery, as I had forgotten about their stand still performances throughout the night. It was such a cool experience to see these different expressions of dance right here in Oshawa.

dancers

RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary. Photo by Mat Calverley.

The Living Room supplied the studio activity for the night, and it really turned up the party vibe. I saw so many people from kids to adults sporting handmade party hats throughout the night, and it really added a fun element to the whole party. To add to the party theme of the night, there were amazingly delicious and colourful cupcakes. What’s a party without cake? The cupcakes might actually have secretly been my favourite part of the night.

Museum hack Tour

RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary. Photo by Mat Calverley.

Some of the other events I didn’t quite get to see, like Museum Hack’s awesome and innovative tour of the galleries and the Friday Film Features screening of “Thank you for supporting the arts” from Eastdale C.V.I. and “7 Deadly Sins” from Sinclair Secondary Dancers, were packed with eager attendees as well. Art & Technique Academy of Hairstyling and Aesthetics mixed up their creativity on our faces too! I had a purple 5 on my face to celebrate the 5th Anniversary, and I saw other happily painted faces too!

Living Room

RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary. Photo by Bronwen Green.

The finished painting from JR Hunter was phenomenal. I was astounded at the end of the night, seeing how he encompassed every aspect of the event into his magnificent painting. It really captured the essence of the night.

RMG Fridays

Photo by Linda Ryde.

All in all, the RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary was an amazing night with so many awesome things happening. And as hard as it is to pick my favourite moment, I think the few I shared sums up what a wonderful time everyone including myself had. Happy five years, RMG Fridays!

Dancer

RMG Fridays 5th Anniversary. Photo by Linda Ryde.

 

Interview with Janice E. McHaffie, Gallery A Artist in Residence

Janice E. McHaffie is our Gallery A ArtLab artist is residence from From January 5 – February 28. Prior to her artist talk on February 7, we sat down with Janice to learn more about her work and what she has been up to during her residency.

RMG: Hi Janice! Please tell us about yourself?

JM: I am an artist from Claremont. I have about 16 years of university level art specific training including 5 years fine arts at Durham College and a year at OCAD. Having started with stone carving at the University of Guelph in the early 1970’s, my work has progressed and metamorphosed into an eclectic range of paintings with hundreds of them in public and private collections around the world. I am also the Youth Liaison for Pineridge Arts Council, Pickering.

 

RMG: What materials do you work with?

JM: While at The RMG I will be working with acrylic ink, acrylic paint, acrylic gels and mediums, watercolour papers canvas board and stretched canvas. I will also be sculpting from whatever moves me at the time to work with.

Janice McHaffie

Janice McHaffie

RMG: Why were you interested in Gallery A’s Art Lab residency? What have you made while working as an artist in residence/ what will you be working on during your residency?

JM: I was interested in the residency in Gallery A because I wanted to interact with the public while creating and wanted to invite them to actively participate with the theme and two art projects. So far, I have only created three small canvas works and some ink on yupo.  By February 25 (closing ceremony 7-9pm) I will have filled all the walls in Gallery A with paintings. I will also have created 2 collages and a sculpture. I am hoping to have close to 100 small paintings done by that date.

 

RMG: Can you please tell us a bit about your exhibition on view in Gallery A or what you intend to create for the viewer?

JM: The paintings on view in Gallery A and everything I create while I am there is following my theme of Dying and Death. I will be opening the floor to talk about these topics, hopefully helping people to converse in an easier format through the visual aid of the artwork.

painting

Janice McHaffie

RMG: What inspires you? Is there a particular artist’s work that has influenced your practice?

JM: What inspires me is everything and everyone who passes through my life, from what others perceive as the profound to the mundane. Children affect me most with their boundless energy and creative inquisitiveness. I love how they just spit out what they are thinking. Coincidentally that is exactly how I am. Artists who have inspired me include Auguste Rodin since I started with stone sculpture, and my initial paintings were inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe. Now I just paint what comes out of me. My work is always about texture and the layers of life, I have been called the “texture queen” for years, and I guess they have a point : ). Every day is an adventure to me and at the RMG. I get to share the adventure with all of you!