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Inaabiwin

Tanya Lukin Linklater, The treaty is in the body 2017. Image still from video, courtesy of Liz Lott.

Inaabiwin

September 22, 2018 - January 06, 2019

Opening reception: Friday, October 5, 7-10pm

Inaabiwin is kinship. Light travelling, illuminating as a flow of energy, igniting a space within a deeper sense of our selves.

Through Indigenous worldview, we embody a relational approach to understanding and interacting with the world around us. This allows us to engage more deeply through complex relationships with ourselves and the natural world. Our diverse relational kinship can be seen as our felt connection and affinity to one another as individuals and our environment. It is our multiplicities of connection that exist within us and around us, allowing us to transmit knowledge through multiple vessels. It is also our non-linear connection to people and place that extends beyond our blood relations to be inclusive of all creation. This exhibition will explore the imaginative territory of Indigenous relational kinship.

This unique relational ontology is reflective of our distinct nations and is essential to our resilience. It has allowed us to pass on our dynamic knowledge systems and ways of being to future generations. “Knowledge is not something contained in a book, a CD or other memory mechanisms. Knowledge, from an Indigenous perspective, is the relationships one has to “all my relations”. In the Indigenous world, everything is animate and has spirit. “All my relations” refers to relationships with everything in creation.” Our relations are what ground us, grow us, and give us meaning. Divergent artistic practices nurture these kinship relations allowing us to thrive and move forward. Our stories, identities and culture live within our kinship and by animating it through creative expression we create new patterns of being for ourselves.
Each of the artists presented in this exhibition engages with Indigenous relational kinship and opens doorways into thinking about what it means to be “in relation”. This Indigenous concept is a unique way of perceiving and acting that acknowledges a felt connection within us. Through the works of these artists this exhibition will explore relational onotology in memory, body, place, and identity. Art practice will be used as a platform to explore the physical manifestations that kinship and felt connection can take.

Indigenous and non-Indigenous viewers will be encouraged to think about and feel their own relations and how they connect to larger worldviews. This project will be guided by Indigenous voices through researched texts, as well as through conversations and visits with respected knowledge keepers.

Inaabiwin is also a metaphor for the work of the artists presented in this exhibition, who have remarkably profound and active practices that each evoke a strong visceral response.

Art Gallery of Mississauga: June 20 – September 1, 2019
Ottawa Art Gallery: October, 2019 – January, 2020
Judith and Norman Alix Art Gallery: February 7 – May 3, 2020

Curated by Danielle Printup

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20180922 20190106 America/Toronto Inaabiwin Opening reception: Friday, October 5, 7-10pm Inaabiwin is kinship. Light travelling, illuminating as a flow of energy, igniting a space within a deeper sense of our selves. Through Indigenous worldview, we embody a relational approach to understanding and interacting with the world around us. This allows us to engage more deeply through complex relationships with ourselves and the natural world. Our diverse relational kinship can be seen as our felt connection and affinity to one another as individuals and our environment. It is our multiplicities of connection that exist within us and around us, allowing us to transmit knowledge through multiple vessels. It is also our non-linear connection to people and place that extends beyond our blood relations to be inclusive of all creation. This exhibition will explore the imaginative territory of Indigenous relational kinship. This unique relational ontology is reflective of our distinct nations and is essential to our resilience. It has allowed us to pass on our dynamic knowledge systems and ways of being to future generations. “Knowledge is not something contained in a book, a CD or other memory mechanisms. Knowledge, from an Indigenous perspective, is the relationships one has to “all my relations”. In the Indigenous world, everything is animate and has spirit. “All my relations” refers to relationships with everything in creation.” Our relations are what ground us, grow us, and give us meaning. Divergent artistic practices nurture these kinship relations allowing us to thrive and move forward. Our stories, identities and culture live within our kinship and by animating it through creative expression we create new patterns of being for ourselves. Each of the artists presented in this exhibition engages with Indigenous relational kinship and opens doorways into thinking about what it means to be “in relation”. This Indigenous concept is a unique way of perceiving and acting that acknowledges a felt connection within us. Through the works of these artists this exhibition will explore relational onotology in memory, body, place, and identity. Art practice will be used as a platform to explore the physical manifestations that kinship and felt connection can take. Indigenous and non-Indigenous viewers will be encouraged to think about and feel their own relations and how they connect to larger worldviews. This project will be guided by Indigenous voices through researched texts, as well as through conversations and visits with respected knowledge keepers. Inaabiwin is also a metaphor for the work of the artists presented in this exhibition, who have remarkably profound and active practices that each evoke a strong visceral response. Art Gallery of Mississauga: June 20 – September 1, 2019 Ottawa Art Gallery: October, 2019 – January, 2020 Judith and Norman Alix Art Gallery: February 7 – May 3, 2020 The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Queen Street, Oshawa, ON, Canada The Robert McLaughlin Gallery communications@rmg.on.ca