Perspective/Prospective

Perspective refers to an outlook and point of view, while prospective is future-oriented, suggesting a vision of what is to come. Both this personal and aspirational approach, encompass the spirit of this student photography project. Presented in partnership with the School of Media, Art and Design at Durham College, this exhibition showcases photographs taken by students in the first year Photography and Video Production program. For the project, the students explored photovoice, a process through which photography is used to reflect lived-experience and connect through the sharing of personal perspectives. They were then invited to tell a personal story through images, documenting their environment and daily experiences.

This project was part of an integrated learning experience where the students learned about the history of the Thomas Bouckley Collection, the power of using photovoice, and the value of looking inward. The Thomas Bouckley Collection, housed at the RMG, has over 3,500 photographs that visualize the history of Oshawa. However, the collection lacks the stories and perspectives of many of Oshawa’s residents. Installed in the Thomas Bouckley Collection corridor, this project is part of The Robert McLaughlin Gallery’s ongoing effort to present diverse perspectives from the community. 

The resulting photographs shared similar themes, reflecting the students’ realities and observations: empty streets or paths, solace in nature, changing environments, the visible impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and exploration of community. We want to thank all of the participating students for sharing their lives with us through the power of photographs.

Shane Kreslin, Waiting, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa GO Station, ON

“I was waiting for my brother to get off the train and wanted to capture the feeling of waiting for a family member or a friend to get off the train.”

Ryan Caley, Twisting Path, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Bowmanville, ON

“The creek is situated right in the middle of Bowmanville, and it is amazing how you feel completely immersed in nature by venturing down some of the less travelled paths while still always being no less than a five minute walk away from a main road or neighbourhood.”

ulon Williams-Stewart, Autumn Leaves , 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa Valley Botanical Garden, Oshawa, ON

“There is a lot to be said about nature. No matter the time of day, weather, or season, it always finds a way to remain breathtaking.”

Walter Cheung, Durham College, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Durham College, Oshawa, ON

“I picked Durham College as my subject because …the memories that I have created here are unforgettable. This building has a special meaning to me because the year that this building was completed was the same year I started my studies at Durham College. It was also the location of my first course.”

Jordan Rushton, Plentiful Apples, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Maple Grove Orchards, Bowmanville, ON

“It conveys a joyful and relatable experience by capturing something anyone can do. I want these photos to allow anyone to bring back memories or make new ones about an apple orchard.”

Shyanne Rodriguez-Kiritpal, Out of the Shadows, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Dean Park, Oshawa, ON

“Halloween is one of my most favorite holidays of the year. Last year in 2020 when COVID-19 hit hard, there were many cancellations of trips, events, parties, as well as holidays, one of them being Halloween.”

Tyler Lee, Cancelled Date, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Parkwood Estate, Oshawa, ON

“With my photos, I try to tell the story of growing up and losing innocence.”

Trinity Wishnowski, Watching Cat, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Niagara Park, Oshawa, ON

“There is nothing that beats the love I have for my friends…taking photos helps us capture moments we might not get again.”

Vanessa Legrow Garnon, Hear a Breeze, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Port Perry, ON

“I want to show the history of places and people. I want my pictures to tell a story, I want it to show the emotions of the person and or place in the picture.”Trinity Wishnowski, Watching Cat, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Niagara Park, Oshawa, ON

“There is nothing that beats the love I have for my friends…taking photos helps us capture moments we might not get again.”

Travis Frost, Chase McAsphalt, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa Pier, Oshawa, ON

“My beautiful friend Chase posing at the Oshawa Pier across from McAsphalt.”

Shivam Puri, Hope, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Whitby, ON

“Photography has helped me with capturing emotional and social issues which has the power to influence and change the world.”

Singh Japneet, Always Together, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa Valley Botanical Garden, Oshawa, ON

“I believe an image is a poem without words and I try to portray stories with my images.”

Sohilahamad Bodar, Facing the Clock, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Toronto, ON

“I tried to show Toronto from the eyes of an international student…if I hadn’t got support from the local community, I would have felt homesickness or not accepted. But I didn’t even feel for a moment that I am an outsider.”

Shahriq Hosain, Food Truck, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Winchester Road Food Trucks, Oshawa, ON

“I created images from the perspective of a man who was raised in the city. I create my personal vision through experiences.”

Emily Ryde, Conquer Darkness, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa, ON

“I wanted to capture Oshawa and the Durham Region in one common way by showcasing the issue we all share commonly in these times.”

Sarah St. Denis, Arts Origin, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Durham College, Oshawa, ON

“Arts Origin is a look inside what it is like to be attending Durham College as a first year Video Production student. I captured this image inside one of the many photography studios on campus while my classmates and I were learning how to properly shoot portrait images.”

Nathan Thompson, Future, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa, ON.

“Future was shot off of Center and King Streets, arguably the highest traffic intersection in Oshawa. This intersection is near the heart of town and has street art at nearly every block as well as the most active bus routes in town. Future captures a feeling of hope.”

Nolan Drew, Leading the Way, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Durham College, Oshawa, ON

“A crucial piece of Oshawa to a lot of people is the
student life and experience, as well as the locations they spend a lot of time at. I took a long walk around the Durham College Oshawa campus, and got plenty of pictures of various buildings and beautiful things in the area.”

Megan Gibbs, Peering Beyond the Canopy, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Lakeview Park, Oshawa, ON

“As someone who loves nature, the variety of sights and plants the Durham region has to offer is a true joy to explore and discover.”

Matthew Peuker, Fireside, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: Langmaid Road, Hampton, ON

“Through my photos, I want to show people that even in the times that feel the darkest, when everyone feels alone, joy can persist. I want to remind people of childlike joy and freedom, where even when fear and anxiety exist, we can still stand up, start walking, and live life with smiles on our faces and joy in our day-to-day lives.”

Marissa Finn, Simcoe United Church, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa, ON

“My husband was a big inspiration behind this work as he is very into history and likes to take our family on trips around town to show us some of his favourite places and tell us some of the history behind them.”

Kyron Maloney, Beach Calling, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Port Darlington, Bowmanville, ON

“Having parents who immigrated from the Caribbean, nice hot weather and beaches was always something to look forward to during the summers. This place reminds me of my childhood summers spent on the beaches of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.”

Kimberly Cooke, Fallin’ with Corona, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Pickering City Hall, Pickering, ON

“The empty benches that would regularly have been filled with friends or families enjoying the fall weather, lay bare and unused due to a virus that attacks us physically and now has wedged a perceptional division in people indefinitely.”

Kyle Mercieca, Social Central, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Riley’s Pub, Oshawa, ON

“When I was in my late teens to early twenties, me and my friends would often go drive and park at the Oshawa parking garage, play some billiards, have a few drinks at the Riley’s Pub, and go on to have a great night. To me, Riley’s was a staple social setting in Durham Region/Oshawa and many memorable nights were spent there.”

Krissha Patterson, Haustvindar, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa Valley Botanical Gardens, Oshawa, ON

“The great outdoors holds so many mysteries and wonders that we all have taken for granted.”

Duale Mohamed Omar, Kolanji In Front of Graffiti in North Oshawa, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa, ON

“This photoshoot showcases art, graffiti, fashion, hip-hop, and the urban scene of Oshawa.”

Muhammad Mutahir, Durham College, Leading the Way, 2021, digital Photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Durham College, Centre for Collaborative Education, Oshawa, ON

“I took a photo of the CFCE building because it’s part of the campus where I go to study and attend classes. I also like the architectural design of the building and how it stands out compared to all the other buildings on campus.”

Katie OConnor, Peaceful Bridge, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa Valley Botanical Gardens, Oshawa, ON

“I have always enjoyed the peacefulness and tranquility that parks can achieve, even in the middle of a bustling city, and wanted to capture that peacefulness.”

Jorge Dorado, Little Bentley, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Lakeview Park, Oshawa, ON

“When I moved to Canada, like many, I had to leave behind great loves. One of them was my dog who, due to immigration and COVID-19 restrictions, will not yet be able to come to his new home. That’s why my interest is to honor the love of my canine son by capturing the day to day lives of people lucky enough to have pets, dreaming of soon being one of them.”

Jarvis Perryman, Building and Sky, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Durham College, Oshawa, ON

“As someone from a small community in Ajax, the architecture around our school is breathtaking.”

Jacqueline Mackle, North Church, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa, ON

“Churches are a big part of my life and I find myself drawn to them, there is so much history there and so many untold stories.”

Jessica Welter, The Mass, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: Camp 30, Bowmanville, ON

“With every image I took at Camp 30 not only am I telling the stories from our history but I am sharing the image in a new light after many years. The story of Camp 30 is not well known but I hope to help shine more light onto this historical monument with my images.”

Pancham Dhupar, Rainy Day Be Like, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa, ON

“I am an international student…I want people to see what I see every day, through my photos.”

Hayden A. Bannister, Rusty Mailboxes, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Bowmanville, ON

“Bowmanville. It’s the town I grew up in, the town I saw change from a tiny industrial workhorse to a lively small city. It has the trifecta; strong farms, strong industry, and, more recently, small but strong urban areas. Despite this change, I believe the beauty of this town is in the old rusty stuff.”

Harshit Donter, Kizashi, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: Uxbridge, ON

“Kizashi” is a Japanese word that means ‘something good is about to happen.’ The title was inspired by the old clock in Downtown Uxbridge and the scene behind it that gave me a feeling that something good will happen.”

Alden Giberson, Bus Stop, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Durham College, Oshawa, ON

“My work explores my personal progression as a photographer but it also showcases my willingness to challenge myself.”

Gemma Mazza, After the Rain, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Rotary Park, Bowmanville, ON

“I’ve always had an appreciation for the outdoors and nature that has since grown a lot this past year and a half. Because of this, I’ve spent a lot more time in parks, paths, and trails where I can experience all kinds of moments.”

Eric Lambert, A Powerful Current, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa Valley Botanical Gardens, Oshawa, ON

“The river reminds me of the times I would go fishing with my grandfather, or “pops,” as I called him before he passed away six years ago. We would chat and joke around and generally just have a good time whilst we were fishing.”

Faizaan Lockhat, Community, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Whitby, ON

“This photograph showcases community, a key pillar that makes up the Durham region.”

Brianna Stokes, Nature’s Bath, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa Valley Botanical Gardens, Oshawa, ON

“As we live our daily lives and attempt to find some type of normalcy, I tend to find myself leaning on the beauty of nature to find a sense of peace. No matter how much I have going on or how much is changing in my life, I know I can always take a quick walk around the block or trip to the park and find myself in awe of the beauty that is nature.”

Emilia Cipollone, Tug of War, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Whitby, ON

“I am a mother of rescue dogs and always will be. Helping animals is my way of helping the community, and giving back however I can.”

Emily Radacz, Elliott, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: St. George’s Anglican Church, Ajax, ON

“I chose to photograph graves in Durham for this exhibition and I focused on group headstones. I couldn’t help but think of the stories these people had or could have had. These are peaceful places where all problems become obsolete.”

Colin Lafond, Autumn History, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Camp 30, Bowmanville, ON

“This photo was taken at Camp 30 while I was walking around taking pictures and noticed the bright autumn colours on the tree nearby. I wanted to document the architecture and different buildings while making it appealing and eye grabbing.”

Connor Agnew, Infinity, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: Paulynn Park, Ajax, ON

“These last couple of months really allowed me to see the artistic world through a different lens. When looking at the world around us objectively, if that’s even possible, it’s easy to see how we take the community we live in for granted.”

Colin Harrop, Fall Warmth, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Ajax, ON

“Growing up and living my whole life in Ajax, I have never really spent the time to appreciate the colours and beauty of the city. Walking to school most of my childhood I never did pay attention to the scenery and wildlife until going around to shoot photos.”

Andrew Baker, Camp 30 Entrance, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Camp 30, Bowmanville, ON

“For this project I had the idea of going to multiple historic buildings throughout Durham region, but after doing some extensive research over a couple of days I decided to do my project on Camp 30 and my perspective on the camp.”

Bobby Quin, What’s the Buzz?, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Parkwood Estate, Oshawa, ON

“What better way to showcase how beautiful the land around us truly is then by capturing it in motion.”

Analyn Whyte, Through the Wreath, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa Valley Botanical Gardens, Oshawa, ON

“I enjoy taking photographs of nature….[it’s] where I feel at home. I like the look of trees and water and especially enjoy the look of the sky at sunset and sunrise.”

Dejah Wocker, Johnson & Johnson, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Walmart, Oshawa, ON

“The COVID-19 pandemic has affected us all in so many ways, from an increase in job loss to the death of people closest to us.”

Eva Modica, Best Burgers, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Olympus Burgers, Port Hope, ON

“I wanted to capture the essence of a family run restaurant in Port Hope, as they are the heart of the town.”

David Dixon, Ghost, 2021, digital photograph. Edition: 1/1
Location: Montgomery Park Road, Pickering, ON

“Thank you, mom, for driving me to shooting locations in the cold, in the rain, and at night. You are the best and you make a great ghost.”Eva Modica, Best Burgers, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Olympus Burgers, Port Hope, ON

“I wanted to capture the essence of a family run restaurant in Port Hope, as they are the heart of the town.”

Aaron Lagler, The Lighthouse, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Heydenshore Boardwalk, 589 Water Street, Whitby, ON

“Coping with insomnia for the last few years of my life, nothing has tossed me further into the depths of loneliness during these times than having to face it alone…The thing that pulled me back to reality most was my art. My art confronts solitude as a form of solace, reminding me that it’s okay to be alone, it’s okay to feel alone; sometimes it’s what we need.”

Patrick Chayer, Playtime, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Kingside Park, Oshawa, ON

“This photo is about my life as a child and the places that have had a huge impact on my life.”

Sartaj Singh, Fresh Buns, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: Toronto, ON

“I recently moved to this city, thus wanted to explore the city life at night.”

Montana Budd-Haynes, Loss Where Hope Once Stood, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: GM Assembly Plant, Oshawa, ON

“I tried to capture what I believe represents Durham Region…including the emotional and historical connection that Oshawa has to the General Motors Assembly Plant.”

Ekansh Yakhmi, Workers, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition AP 1/1
Location: Punjab, India

“I have captured farmlands and a scene of harvesting from my community in Punjab, India.”

Jason Kruetzmann, All Roads Lead to Home, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Conlin Road East and Harmony Road South, Oshawa, ON

“It took me a long time to find somewhere that felt like home. Through my teens and twenties, I travelled the country, chasing that elusive “home” feeling. Nothing ever felt right until I moved to Oshawa. The growth and potential of this city is awe-inspiring, and I’m proud to call it my home.”

Natasha Miles, Present, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Port Perry, ON

“Being by the water brings me peace and a sense of calm and connectedness; it is a time of reflection and closure as the waves ripple towards me.”

Norbert Turoczi, Places To Be, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1.
Location: Toronto, ON

“I focused on showcasing my city’s most valued asset, the people who live in it. Toronto is a fast-moving city; no matter the time of the day, there will always be floods of people marching up and down the street.”

Brooke Warner, Woman Warrior, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa Fire Department Station 1, Oshawa, ON

“As a photographer and a passionate volunteer within my community, I strive to capture important people and places that make a difference in the community. Jessica Crombie is one of five female firefighters in the Oshawa Fire Department stationed at the Department Headquarters, Station One. Each station specializes in a different area of training; Station One specializes in survival training.”

Erik Smith, Tradition, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Dr. Roberta Bondar Public School, Ajax, ON

“This picture captures fond memories of walking to school every day with the community of friends and people I once used to know. I also challenge anyone to visit the baseball stadium at Dr. Roberta Bondar and not find a pop can stuck in the pole.”

Emilie Maltais, Little Adventures, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa, ON

“As a mother, I know how important each moment and memory can be, and I hope to be able to catch as many as I can so that I may preserve them in time.”

Rebecca Otto, Parkwood Sculpture, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Parkwood Estate, Oshawa, ON

“I am not from Durham Region, so I got to explore and learn about the history of Durham through sculptures. Across Durham Region there is a wide variety of sculptures each telling an innovative story about the history and the life before. For each sculpture I photographed it related in a symbolic way to my life and experiences.”

Michael Mlynarczyk, Construction, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: King Street, Downtown Oshawa, ON

“Oshawa is a city full of character, especially downtown, home to great little restaurants, boutiques shops, unique stores, exciting people, developments, and much more. It has its flaws and the potential to be a great place, which I have noticed whenever I’m out in the city, there are constantly updates or improvements being made.”

Kayleigh Algar, Planes of the Past, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition: 1/1
Location: Tyrone Mills, Bowmanville, ON

“Travel has always been a part of me, a part of my culture, and a part of my community…With every passing moment in a new environment, I can see the stories that have been told there. This time, the stories that have been shared all revolve around a mill producing flour and manufacturing lumber in the Durham Region.”

Liam McManus, From The Past to No Mask, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Courtice, ON

“Both sides to the image tell a story…the pandemic was not easy for anyone, including me, so I wanted to show that in a picture.”

Jonathan Miller, Weather Vane, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Windfields, Oshawa, ON

“I think that the story of how the places we live in came to be is most often neglected. Exploring our current living spaces for links to the past is another way that my work attempts to connect history to place.”

Cameron McNeely, Contamination, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Kinsmen Civic Memorial Stadium, Oshawa, ON

“As a new resident in the Durham region, I decided there is no better way of experiencing the area than to explore downtown Oshawa, the heart of this city, and its surrounding area. This photo reflects my first impressions of the city of Oshawa and my experience so far as a new resident.”

Robyn McGrenere, Solitude, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Lakeview Park, Oshawa, ON

“As someone who is not from the area and grew up in Trenton, ON with nature all around me, moving to a bigger city was quite the change. Shortly after moving here, I discovered the Lakeview Park Beach and instantly felt more at home.”

Logan James, Expansion of Port Perry, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Across from Old Simcoe Road and Paxton Street, Port Perry, ON

“While attending Durham College I am living from home in my home town of Port Perry. As an artist and on a personal level I wanted to create a collection of images that show the ongoing development of my neighbourhood… This is a big change for myself and my town, as throughout my life there has been little development of my surroundings.”

Jacobin Mathews, Magician, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Steve’s Leather Fashions, 70 Bond St. W, Oshawa

“I am from Kerala, India where one of my best childhood memories consists of my mother taking me and my brother to a tailor shop every new year for new clothes.”

Taylor Will, The Boardwalk, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Waterfront Park, Ajax, ON

“As a first-year international student living in Canada, taking photos everywhere I go has been one of the best ways for me to not only explore and familiarize myself with my new surroundings in the Durham region, but also help me bring the stories of my new adventures to life when sharing them with my friends and family back home.”

Jaden Howson-Visser, The Art of Staining, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Guelph, ON

“Being born in Guelph and raised by my father who is a portrait artist for a living meant I got to see a lot of the art community at work not only in the public eye but also behind the scenes… This is local artist Lynn Chadwick soldering together stained glass art for a church.”

Bryanna Fudge, Building of Hope, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: CMHA Durham, Oshawa, ON

“I chose to photograph the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) building because since the age of fifteen, I have been using their services. Being so young and going through two large milestones was challenging. That building is lifesaving. Walking in those doors, you are welcomed and accepted no matter what your life story is.”

Jacey Boyer, A Century Home, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Port Perry, ON

“When I think about my community, Port Perry, I think about all the historical buildings. There are many across Port Perry and they always catch my eye.”

Stuart Foster, Transit, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: Durham College, Oshawa, ON

“I documented how I experience Oshawa, and Durham Region as a whole. I decided to photograph a few of my frequent spots around the city, and more importantly how I got there.”

Jacqueline Woods, Home, 2021, digital photograph. Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa, ON

“My childhood home… helped stimulate my creativity and curiosity for photography.”

Aaron McInnes, Retirement Home Workers, 2021,
digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Oshawa, ON

“These are my parents who work at a long-term care home as food service aide workers for the elderly… they are the hardest working people I know and a big inspiration to me.”

Jayde Duhn, Fifty Shades of Orange, 2021, digital photograph.
Edition 1/1
Location: Parking garage, downtown Oshawa, ON

“These sunset images that I chose were taken in downtown Oshawa. I took them while on a walk. One of the messages I wanted to convey was that even though we live in a city, it is still possible to see the beauty our earth has to offer.”

Please be sure to visit both the onsite exhibition at The Robert McLaughlin Gallery on display until June 5, 2022, as well as the online exhibition that includes all of the student’s work here

Community Connections

The Robert McLaughlin Gallery (RMG) teamed up with Community Development Council Durham’s (CDCD) Community Connections Program to highlight the experiences of newcomers and immigrants in Durham Region. The Thomas Bouckley Collection, housed at the RMG, has over 3,500 photographs that visualize the history of Oshawa. However, the collection lacks the stories and perspectives of many of Oshawa’s residents. This community project is part of an ongoing effort to address these gaps, and to celebrate the community in its entirety.

The CDCD is a not-for-profit organization that has focused on enhancing the quality of life for individuals, families and communities in Durham for more than 50 years. CDCD’s Community Connections Program gives opportunities for new immigrants to Canada to practice English in conversation circles, learn about their community, meet new friends, and enjoy social events celebrating equity and inclusivity. Together, the RMG and the CDCD developed a community project aimed at giving participants an understanding about the history of their new community, as well as making them feel connected and a part of it. Following virtual workshops, the participants were tasked with taking photographs that capture their lives in their new community, and consider their important role within it. Their contributions are celebrated in this exhibition and will be added to the Thomas Bouckley Collection, upholding Bouckley’s vision to collect images that reflect the continued evolution of Oshawa.

Participants submitted a wide range of photographs including quiet moments, intimate interior views, community events, special locations and family gatherings, reflecting their experiences and daily realities of living in their new community. The RMG would like to thank all the participants for their incredible enthusiasm and willingness to share these important images of their lived experiences.

Come Out, Come Out

Curated by Sonya Jones and Lucas Cabral

Related Public Programming: Keeping Our Stories Alive: Webinar with Raegan Swanson, Executive Director, The ArQuives
Thursday, May 28, 2:00PM (EST)

In November 2019, the RMG invited members of the community to share photographs that represent LGBTQ2+ histories and stories for inclusion in the Thomas Bouckley Collection. This project, presented in partnership with the AIDS Committee of Durham Region and The Totally Outright Program, is part of an ongoing effort to address the lack of diverse representation in the collection, and in historical accounts of Oshawa and Durham Region as a whole. While the Thomas Bouckley Collection has over 3,500 photographs that visualize Oshawa’s history, the collection lacks the stories and perspectives of many marginalized communities. This exhibition, featuring a selection of the submissions, celebrates these underrepresented stories and addresses the omission of LGBTQ2+ representation from institutional archives by adding these contributions to the Thomas Bouckley Collection for future generations.

Currently, the Thomas Bouckley Collection contains images of everything from plane crashes and floods, to snowy backyards and family picnics, capturing a wide spectrum of life in Oshawa. Similarly, the photographs in Come Out, Come Out comprise a range of images from vernacular snapshots of loved ones, to more documentary-style images of community outreach and events, most of which were taken in the last ten years. When Thomas Bouckley gifted his collection of historical photographs, he did so with the intention that the collection continue to grow and document Oshawa’s ongoing evolution. Because history is being made every day, we hope these new additions to the collection will allow future viewers to look back on the Come Out, Come Out contributions and have a better understanding of Oshawa’s shared history.

The need to collect LGBTQ2+ histories and stories does not end with this online exhibition; there is more work to be done. We continue to encourage the public to share stories and photos with us by using the hashtag #ComeOutComeOutRMG. We hope to build upon the images we have already received to continue this important project.

Marc Hall and Jean-Paul Dumond attend prom at Monsignor John Pereyma Catholic Secondary School in Oshawa, 2002. Marc Hall successfully sued the Durham Catholic District School Board for the right to bring his boyfriend to his high school prom. The case made international headlines and Hall’s story has been featured in documentaries, television movies and his story adapted to stage. His efforts were supported by various community organizations, and as a result, he became an icon for LGBTQ2+ rights in Canada.

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Presented in partnership with the AIDS Committee of Durham Region and The Totally Outright Program

Brilliant Impressions

In the 20th century printmakers began to move beyond the small, intimate, and monotone works of earlier centuries to explore scale, colour, and experimental techniques. Spurred largely by wider access to materials, the 20th century saw a burgeoning print scene begin that still exists today. This exhibition features artworks from the RMG’s Permanent Collection that showcase a variety of approaches to printmaking. The works display not only the main methods of printmaking, but also many of the artists included have combined techniques or pushed the medium’s limits in ways that make the works unique and exciting to view. As a printmaker myself, I am drawn to the various techniques, labour intensive processes, and potential for experimentation that is evident in these works.

Printmaking, as a term describes the artistic process of transferring an image from a matrix (the object on which the image or design is formed) onto another surface, often paper or fabric. There are four main printmaking methods: relief, intaglio, planographic, and stencil. Relief printing, such as woodcut and linocut, is when ink is applied to the surface of a block (stone, wood etc.) resulting in graphic images. This technique also offers the possibility of more refined line work, such as in Eric Nasmith’s Great Horned Owl (1980) where carved linework is used to create delicate textures in the foliage and owl’s feathers. Joan Marie Dean’s Isis (1977), with its smooth tones and line work is a great example of intaglio techniques – a process where ink is held in the incised lines of a plate such as with etching or engraving – allowing for a wide tonal range and fine detail.

Kenojuak Ashevak (Inuit, 1927-2013), Sun Owl and Foliage (Lithographs by Kenojuak), 1979, lithograph on paper. Gift of M. Sharf, 1986.

Planographic methods such as lithography are unlike either relief or intaglio as they are printed from a flat surface. In doing so they offer unique opportunities for fine linework, details and a quality similar to drawing, exemplified by Kenojuak Ashevak’s Sun Owl and Foliage (1979) which shows has a quality similar to coloured pencil, combined with smooth planes of colour. Finally, stencil methods such as serigraph use a stencil to block out areas that are not to be printed; passing ink only to the areas that are part of the image, as seen in Lawren P. Harris’ Chevrons #3 (1973) which has layers of coloured lines laid out over the toned paper.

In each technique, there is a high level of technical process involved, from creating the image, preparing the materials, and printing the finalized artwork. Repetition of the steps becomes a type of meditation, yet at each point of the process there is opportunity for exploration and experimentation, allowing artists to push the limits of the medium. Some artists combine more than one technique. For example, Noboru Sawai’s Antique Birdcage (1979) makes strategic use of woodcut and etching techniques to create a highly detailed and colourful image held within the black lines of a cage. This captivating combination of techniques uses various formal strategies to highlight the central image.

From woodcut to etching, serigraph to lithograph, each of the artists in this exhibition have thoroughly explored and experimented with how printmaking can be used to create spectacular imagery. As a fellow printmaker, I see in these works the labour of love behind the brilliant, bold and colourful images that capture life, storytelling, and visual expression.

Tony Urquhart (Canadian, b. 1934), Unknown Landscape, 1965, woodcut and coloured paper on paper. Purchase, 1970.
Lucy Qinnuayuak (Inuit, 1915 – 1982), Mother Bird, 1969, stonecut on paper. Gift of Georges Loranger, 1983.
Mary E. Rawlyk (Canadian, b. 1934), Ironing, 1974, relief-printed etching, serigraphy and off-set process on paper. Purchase, 1980.
Noboru Sawai (Canadian b. Japan, 1931-2017), Antique Birdcage, 1979, etching and woodcut on paper. Gift of Walter Carsen, 1987.
Nicholas Novak (Canadian, 1954 – 1980), Untitled, 1977, lithograph on paper. Purchase, 1977.
Otis Tamasaukas (Canadian, b. 1947), Muskoka Chicken, 1976, etching on paper. Gift of Mollie & Peter Carswell, 2004.
David Milne (Canadian, 1882 – 1953), Waterfall, 1930, drypoint with surface tone on paper. Gift from the Douglas M. Duncan Collection, 1970.
Jamasie Teevee (Inuit, 1910-1985),Young Hunters, lithograph on paper. Gift of M. Sharf, 1986.
Eric Nasmith (Canadian, 1916 – 1985), Great Horned Owl, 1980, woodcut on paper. Gift of Julie Nasmith and Carol Harris, 1991.
Louis Stokes (b. 1941), Boundaries Series/White, 1976, serigraph on paper. Purchase, 1976.
Kenojuak Ashevak (Inuit, 1927-2013), Sun Owl and Foliage (Lithographs by Kenojuak), 1979, lithograph on paper, Gift of M. Sharf, 1986.
Phyllis Kurtz Fine (Canadian, 1924-1978), White Pair on Black, 1974, etching on paper. Gift of the Ontario Arts Council, 1974.
John Lander (Canadian, 1951 – 1992), Landscape with Swans, 1974, serigraph on paper. Purchase, 1976.
John Esler (Canadian, 1933 – 2001), To Climb a Mountain (Gallery Moos Twentieth Anniversary Portfolio), 1978, etching on paper. Gift of Walter Carsen, 1987.
Brenda Joy Lem (Canadian, b. 1961), A Clear Flame, 2008, silkscreen on paper. Purchase, 2009.
Lawren P. Harris (Canadian, 1910 – 1994), Chevrons #3, 1973, serigraph on paper. Gift of Georges Loranger, 1986.
Joan-Marie Dean (Canadian, 1934-2015), Isis, 1977, etching and aquatint on paper. Purchase, 1977.
Anthony Benjamin (British, 1931-2002), Erase Function (Editions 1), 1972, serigraph on paper. Gift of the Ontario Arts Council, 1974.
Lynda Hayward (b. 1941), Weedscape I, 1977, photo-serigraph monotype on paper. Purchase, 1977.

Water Sign: Echoes of Lake Ontario

My fascination with Lake Ontario took hold during the winter of 2019—the first season I spent living in walking distance of the lake. As a white settler who grew up in the Oak Ridges Moraine, I certainly was aware of the lake but, up until that winter, had largely taken for granted its vitality as a life source to the region. Though it occupies the smallest surface area of all the Great Lakes, approximately one quarter of Canada’s population inhabits its watershed. The lake provides drinking water to over nine million people, and is home to countless wildlife and plant species. Over the course of that winter, I began reflecting on how those of us who live in this watershed relate to this body of water, and what shifts when we take time to listen to it. 

When presented with the opportunity to curate a selection of works from both the RMG’s Permanent Collection and Thomas Bouckley Collection, I wondered what stories of the lake I might find, and how artists’ perspectives of the lake had shifted over time. What would artists’ past and contemporary perceptions of Lake Ontario reveal about our present relationship with it? This question is considered throughout the exhibition’s 29 works—ranging across painting, photography and printmaking—which emerge from both collections and span the last 150 years. It is important to note that early to mid-20th century works by European-descendant settler artists make up a significant amount of the portrayals of the lake in the collections and in this exhibition. I find it critical to bring attention to whose lived realities with the lake are largely missing from these portrayals; namely, the profound relationships Indigenous nations have had with this waterbody for millennia. I have intentionally bookended the exhibition with two works by contemporary Indigenous artists from the Great Lakes region, which are featured in the Permanent Collection. Beginning and concluding the exhibition with these works aims to impart a reminder of Indigenous nations’ relationships with the Great Lakes, and their ongoing stewardship of the region.

This exhibition attempts to construct a snapshot of how the lake has been viewed during the last century of settlement and industrialization, from the vantage point of the lake’s north shore in Durham Region. The title Water Sign: Echoes of Lake Ontario surfaced from the strategy I implemented in selecting the artworks, which involved foregrounding representations of the lake where the waterbody seemed to be telling its own version of this history. In looking and listening for signs of life from the lake in the archives, I endeavoured to highlight it as a living force. The works have been grouped by theme as well as medium to bring into focus the lake’s different geographies, and are presented in the following sequence: “Beginnings,” “The lake in front of the lens,” “Reflections in colour throughout the 20th century,” “Oshawa Creek,” “Expansive geographies of the Great Lakes,” and “The lake’s present and future ecologies.” Together, these themes narrate this recent history of representation in the collections, and provide reflection on the historical contexts that shape how we sense the lake today.

Beginnings

This theme considers different beginnings in relation to the lake. The first work, Nanabush and the Giant Pike (n.d.) by Blake Debassige, an Ojibwe artist from M’Chigeeng First Nation on the Georgian Bay, anchors the Great Lakes as vital to Anishinaabe culture. Here, Debassige vividly portrays Nanabush travelling across water, a protagonist in Ojibwe storytelling who is both a culture hero and trickster figure. Although it is unclear which lake this is situated on, Debassige’s work points to how the Great Lakes have sustained and been home to Indigenous cultures and ways of understanding the world for millennia. Juxtaposed with this self-representation of Indigenous culture is British-born settler artist Frederic Waistell Jopling’s idealization of French voyageur Étienne Brûlé’s travels of the Great Lakes thanks to the guidance of Indigenous tribes in Etienne Brule’s Last Lap of the Portage to Lake Ontario, 1615 (n.d). Brûlé was likely the first European to arrive to Lake Ontario four centuries ago.

Blake Debassige (M’Chigeeng, b. 1956), Nanabush and the Giant Pike, n.d., acrylic on canvas. Gift of David and Suzanne Peacock, 2014.

Blake Debassige (M’Chigeeng, b. 1956), Nanabush and the Giant Pike, n.d., acrylic on canvas. Gift of David and Suzanne Peacock, 2014.

F. W. Jopling (Canadian b. England, 1859 – 1945), Etienne Brule’s Last Lap of the Portage to Lake Ontario, 1615, n.d., etching on paper.
Gift of Serry and H. Max Swartz in honour of Sybil and Manning Swartz, 1987.

F. W. Jopling (Canadian b. England, 1859 – 1945}, Etienne Brule’s Last Lap of the Portage to Lake Ontario, 1615, n.d., etching on paper. Gift of Serry and H. Max Swartz in honour of Sybil and Manning Swartz, 1987.

Lotti Thomas’s Prima Terra Nova (1984) narrates the ensuing colonization of Canada by European settlers arriving via waterways and the beginning of mass European settlement. Finally, two maps from the mid-1800s are the earliest representations of the lake in the collections, which both depict the lake as a void, negative space. These maps exemplify a settler-colonial way of seeing water and land from an elevated bird’s-eye view, as something to be controlled.

Lotti Thomas (Canadian b. Amsterdam, 1935 – 2017), Prima Terra Nova,1984, lithography, glitter, fabric and metallic thread on paper. Purchase, 1985.
Sydenham Harbour Map (Oshawa Harbour), 1841, The Thomas Bouckley Collection.
Map of Oshawa – Whitby, 1860, The Thomas Bouckley Collection.

The lake in front of the lens

Taken in the early 1900s, these photographs from the Thomas Bouckley Collection reveal some of the earliest imprints of the lake itself in the gallery’s collections. Presented in black-and-white, with humans largely omitted from view, the lake is foregrounded as a living force. For instance, in Oshawa On The Lake In Winter (1919), a light leak on the photograph’s film can be interpreted as the lake transgressing the image frame; in Ice Formation, Lake Ontario (n.d.), a wave has monumentally crystalized in mid-break. Meanwhile, in Shipwreck (1921), a suspended wave occupies the bottom frame of the image, almost as if, only moments later, it overtook the photographer’s lens. Showing the wreckage of a wooden vessel in the middle ground—likely from a coal barge—the image attests to the power of the lake.

Ed Saunders, Oshawa On The Lake, 1911. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Canoeing in the Harbour, 1911. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Shipwreck, 1921. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Oshawa On The Lake In Winter, 1919. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Ice Formation, Lake Ontario, n.d.. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Reflections in colour throughout the 20th century

Here, an array of paintings from the Permanent Collection depict bodies of water during various seasons and times of day. Although not every painting is directly representative of Lake Ontario, these works by Southern Ontario-based artists provide reflections on the nature of water as always being in flux. The sun is dazzlingly reflected in the seascape of William Blair Bruce’s Lake Ontario (n.d.), while Florence H. McGillivray’s Moon Magic (1933) highlights the lunar influence on water’s movements. Season of Frost (1962) by Gustav Weisman uncovers a lake’s icy depths in the cold of winter. Emma May Martin’s Breakers – Ocean or Lake (n.d.) speaks to how easily Lake Ontario could be mistaken for an ocean when looking out at its wide expanse.

William Blair Bruce (Canadian, 1859 – 1906), Lake Ontario, n.d., oil on canvas. Purchased with the assistance of the Government of Canada through the Cultural Property Export and Import Act, 1986.

Florence H. McGillivray (Canadian, 1864 – 1938), Moon Magic, 1933, oil on board. Gift of Joan and W. Ross Murray, 1994.

E. May Martin (Canadian, 1865 – 1957), Breakers – Ocean or Lake, n.d., watercolour on paper. Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Lande.

E. May Martin (Canadian, 1865 – 1957), Breakers – Ocean or Lake, n.d., watercolour on paper. Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Lande.

Gustav Weisman (Canadian b. Lithuania, 1926), Season of Frost, 1962, oil on masonite. Gift of the artist, 1995.

Oshawa Creek

This selection of photographs spans a 100-year history of Oshawa Creek, Oshawa’s main watercourse into Lake Ontario. These images of the creek provide glimpses of the broader history of the city’s relationship with the lake and its waterways: as the backbone of industry, as a site of recreation and, at times, an infrastructural hazard. During the second half of the 19th century and early 20th century, the Oshawa Creek Valley was home to booming industry. Many of the industries made use of the creek’s waters for its production and, like in the Don River westward, unleashed high levels of pollution back into the stream, which eventually flowed out into the lake. The creek endured throughout these different periods of the city’s economic activity and today, as we see in Fred Sewell’s photograph Oshawa Creek at William Street (2011), the creek continues to flow south, sustaining the plants and beings that rely on its watershed.

The “Grapevine” Swimming Hole, 1908. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Spillway Opened to Bypass Warren Mill, 1909. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Oshawa Creek Flood, 1915. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Midtown Mall Construction, 1968, Sept. 4. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Fred Sewell, Oshawa Creek at William Street, 2011. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Expansive geographies of the Great Lakes

Lake Ontario is critically connected to the wider Great Lakes’ network. Several works in the collections speak to this interconnection through the movement of water, as well as people and goods, across the lakes. In Jopling’s Whirlpool Rapids Illuminated – New York Side (1916), we get a sense of the sheer force of the Niagara River’s enlivened motion, which cascades between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. In Ed Bartram’s Island Forms (1973) depicting the Georgian Bay, and Valerie Palmer’s Perpetua (1993) set by Lake Superior, we are shown suspended moments of transition set against the rocky terrain of the Canadian Shield, which envelops both northern shores of Lake Huron and Lake Superior. Concerning the industrialization of the basin over the last century, large steam vessels and cargo ships—as pictured in Steam Vessel Leaving Harbour (1910) and Robert Bourdeau’s Ontario, Canada (1985)—have travelled to and from Lake Ontario’s ports throughout the decades to exchange goods across this network, on both sides of the Canada-US border.

Steam Vessel Leaving Harbour, 1910. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

F. W. Jopling (Canadian b. England, 1859 – 1945), Whirlpool Rapids Illuminated – New York Side, 1916, mezzotint and drypoint on paper. Gift of Joan and W. Ross Murray, 1976.

F. W. Jopling (Canadian b. England, 1859 – 1945), Whirlpool Rapids Illuminated – New York Side, 1916, mezzotint and drypoint on paper. Gift of Joan and W. Ross Murray, 1976.

Valerie Palmer (Canadian, b. 1950), Perpetua, 1993, oil on linen. Anonymous Gift, 2015.

Robert Bourdeau (Canadian, b. 1933), Ontario, Canada, 1985/86, silver gelatin print on paper, mounted on mat board 1/30. Gift of Sean Bourdeau, 2016.

The lake’s present and future ecologies

Ecological awareness around the importance of the lake and its integral role in sustaining a complex ecosystem has only increased in recent decades. Eric Nasmith’s Whimbrel Moving West on Lake Ontario (1976) and Barry Smylie’s Communication should come this naturally to everyone (1991) portray examples of the many species who rely on this ecosystem. Don Wotton’s Central Lake Ontario Conservation Authority (2011) documents the authority’s headquarters near the Oshawa Creek, established in 1958 to redress the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the region. Today, the organization continues to ensure the health of Durham Region’s watersheds. The photograph The Delegate Visits the McLaughlin Gallery (2007) by Jeff Thomas, an Iroquois artist from Six Nations Reserve and Buffalo, NY, speaks back to the stereotyped representations of Indigenous peoples and their erasure from contemporary urban spaces. Taken on the front lawn of the RMG, Thomas presents his protagonist Chief Red Robe standing next to the beavers of Mary Anne Barkhouse’s public sculpture Grace (2007) as a testament to ongoing Indigenous presence. Finally, the most recent depiction of the lake in the gallery’s collections is Morris Lum’s Diptych 3 (2017). Lum leaves us with a bisected conclusion with which to consider the future of the lake, its evolving industries and changing climate.

Eric Nasmith (Canadian, 1916 – 1985), Whimbrel Moving West on Lake Ontario, 1976, woodcut on paper. Gift of Julie Nasmith and Carol Harris, 1991.

Don Wotton, Central Lake Ontario Conservation Authority, 2011. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Don Wotton, Central Lake Ontario Conservation Authority, 2011. The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Jeff Thomas (Iroquois, b. 1956), The Delegate Visits the McLaughlin Gallery, 2007, colour photograph on paper. Gift of the artist, 2009.

Barry Smylie (Canadian, b. 1948), Communication should come this naturally to everyone, 1991, lithograph on paper. Gift of the artist, 1991.

Morris Lum (Chinese Canadian b. Trinidad, 1983), Diptych 3, 2017, archival pigment print on paper. Purchased with the financial support of the Isabel McLaughlin Acquisition Fund and the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program, 2017.

Oshawa in Bloom

Part of Oshawa’s charm comes from its natural and architectural heritage, which is heightened by the community’s beautiful landscape and gardens. This collection of photographs from The Thomas Bouckley Collection looks back at Oshawa’s historical gardens and celebrates the community’s long and continued tradition of producing beautiful private and public gardens.

Oshawa has various associations that promote community and public gardens, including The Oshawa Garden Club, formerly the Oshawa Horticultural Society, established in 1931. The society has long encouraged horticulture throughout the city and promoted the creation and upkeep of public gardens to enhance Oshawa’s green spaces. Its membership has always had a passion for gardening and are devoted to maintaining Oshawa’s horticultural beauty.

The City of Oshawa is also dedicated to this cause. The landscape team grows all of their own flowers in city greenhouses, designing, planting, and maintaining Oshawa’s many public gardens, flower displays and hanging baskets that brighten the downtown and park spaces. Over the last few years, the city has also increased the number of community gardens located on city-owned land. These gardens are community driven projects run by volunteers and local community groups, with a deep commitment to community engagement and learning. Additionally, Oshawa has been designated a Bee City by Bee City Canada for its commitment to maintaining and developing pollinator-friendly public gardens and amending by-laws to encourage planting and reduce mowing.

For over 20 years, Oshawa has participated in the Communities in Bloom competition. The organization evaluates communities based on landscape, gardens, community involvement and overall cleanliness, and has recognized Oshawa with numerous Provincial, National, and International awards. While these awards honour the recent history of Oshawa’s landscape, these photographs show there is no doubt that the city has always been home to beautiful public and private gardens.

George McLaughlin Home, c. 1905

Formal flowerbeds of perennials decorate the front of the house. This house was torn down in 1910 and G.W. McLaughlin had a new home built in its place.

Robert McLaughlin Home, c. 1880

Hanging pots and window boxes adorn the verandah. The curved driveway is lined by trees, shrubs, and a neatly edged lawn. This residence later served as the St. Andrew’s United Church manse for some years before it was torn down.

F.W. Cowan Residence, c. 1915

In the front of this house is a grand curving driveway and formal gardens. The house is located at Simcoe Street and McGrigor Street, the current site of Adelaide House, YWCA.

The Keddie Home, c. 1898

The Keddie family is posed on the front lawn for a family portrait. Left to right: Mary Keddie, holding a croquet mallet; Will G. Keddie, leaning on a bicycle; Charles K. Keddie, with a lacrosse stick; James Boyd Keddie, seated in a rocking chair; Helen Keddie (a school teacher), standing behind the chair; Jean Keddie, standing on the front steps; Luke Keddie, seated on the grass; Henrietta Ritson Keddie, seated behind him; Arthur Keddie, Standing in the centre of this group; Flora Keddie (mother of Luke), seated on a rocker in a dark dress; Emily Louise Keddie (later Mrs. Tom Henderson), standing on the right. The house is a vine-covered two storey brick with a glassed entrance porch.

War Memorial, Memorial Park, c. 1930

The war memorial that stands today in Memorial Park is due to the efforts of Dr. T.E. Kaiser,, who along with the memorial committee, undertook a massive fundraising drive to ensure a memorial that honours those who served in WWI. It was unveiled on Nov. 11, 1924. The memorial and the surrounding gardens is called “The Garden of the Unforgotten.”

Backyard of King Street East Home, 1960

A rare glimpse of a backyard garden located at 339 King Street East.

Isaac French Homestead, 1895

View of the south facade and yard of this brick two-storey house located on Thornton Road with gingerbread scrollwork around the eaves. In the yard, Mr. French is with his wife, surrounded by the numerous beehives on their property. Other members of the family can be seen close to the house. A young man wearing a cardigan and a straw hat can be seen in the centre background, in front of the clapboard one-story addition to the house.

John Ritson Home, c. 1905

Located at Ritson Road and Olive Avenue, this clapboard house has a large clematis vine covering a trellis beside the front entrance. A well cared for flower garden boarders the perimeter of the house. A wooden walkway leads past the house towards the side yard where there is a wooden windmill, which was built in 1890.

Guy House, c. 1880

This clapboard house located on Sydenham Farm at Bonniebrae Point, near Henry Street and Lakeview Park Avenue has a large front yard full of pruned shrubs and flowerbeds. Two chairs are set on the front porch for looking out to the garden.

Mothersill Home, c. 1890

A picket fence surrounds the Mothersill property that was located at Cedar Street and Thomas Street. Mature trees bracket the view of the front verandah and garden where several family members are seated. All are identified, left to right: Fred Mothersill, Mary Robinson Mothersill, Charlotte Mothersill, Howard Mothersill (son of Eugene), and Eugene Mothersill.

King Family Residence, 1890

William King, a major property owner in Oshawa, purchased this property. Later it became a hostel for men called “The House of Friendship” and later still it was used as a children’s shelter.

The matriarch of the family is sitting in a rocker on the lawn in front of the verandah decorated with hanging baskets.

Mothersill Home, Cedar Dale, c. 1905

Without the space for a garden in the front, this family decorated their home with potted plants and a cascading window box.

Children Posed in Front of Home, 1960

Four children pose in the front garden of their home at 339 King Street East.

Prospect Park, c. 1910

This privately owned park is now the site of Parkwood Estates and Gardens. The grounds were first owned by J.B Warren, who built a large wooden home here. It then came into the possession of W.H. Gibbs, who built his palatial residence that is known as “Prospect House” on this block. Succeeding owners were Colonel Mulligan and Eli Edmondson. R.S. McLaughlin had Prospect House torn down and erected the present Parkwood residence c. 1915.

Note the decorative pathways, gazebo, and electric lights.

Oshawa Fair – Robert Brooks Display, c. 1906

Members of the Brooks family are shown here in front of their vegetable display at the Oshawa Fair, which was held at Alexandra Park.

Blinkbonnie, c. 1883

Owned by John Wilson, this two storey “Regency Style” house located at the south-west corner of King Street east and Wilson Road. The former sea captain had a pond installed in his garden and named the estate Blinkbonnie. In the image, trees and shrubs fill the garden and a man can be seen in the background enjoying a ride in a steam-powered paddle-wheeler.

Robert McLaughlin Funeral, 1921

This photograph was taken at the memorial service for Robert McLaughlin at the Parkwood estate gardens.

Cedar Arch over Simcoe Street North, 1919

A vine covered cedar arch is mounted over Simcoe Street North, directly in front of Parkwood estate.

Picking Raspberries, c. 1892

Several people are seen in Isaac French’s raspberry patch located on Thornton’s Road North East side.

Ellesmere Hall, c. 1880

Ellesmere Hall, built c.1870, was the home of the T.N. Gibbs family. Mr. Gibbs sold the house in 1889 to the Church of England who turned it into a school for girls, Bishop Bethune College.

Ellesmere Hall, c. 1880

View of the walkway leading to the T.N. Gibbs family home. The path is lined with formal gardens. The property was located at Simcoe Street and Gibb Street.

Isabel McLaughlin in the Conservatory, Parkwood, Oshawa, 1948

Parkwood estate has long boasted one of the most beautiful gardens in Oshawa, and at one point had eleven greenhouses and a gardening staff of twenty-four. Isabel McLaughlin is shown sketching in her family’s conservatory, which was built to entertain guests.

Adelaide Mowbray McLaughlin, c. 1950

Adelaide McLaughlin poses in front of a lilac tree in her Parkwood estate garden. She was an avid and knowledgeable gardener who loved to study flower varieties. She would often host charitable events at her Parkwood gardens, and oversaw all of the estate’s gardens and greenhouses.

Roaring 20s in Oshawa

In case you missed it! “Oshawa in the Roaring Twenties”, a virtual talk with Nicole Adams, Local History and Genealogy Librarian at the Oshawa Public Libraries.

When one thinks of the roaring twenties it’s easy to conjure up an image of a lively Great Gatsby-like scene full of flappers, speakeasies and decadent parties. In reality, the decade reflected how the horrors and losses experienced during the First World War and the 1918 Pandemic transformed society. For some, the 1920s was a period of prosperity, political and social change, and economic growth, but it was also an age of high unemployment and racial injustice, when women had to fight for the right to be considered “persons” under the law. This exhibition brings together images from the collections of the Oshawa Museum, Oshawa Public Library and Thomas Bouckley Collection to explore what the roaring twenties meant to Oshawa.  

General Motors Workers, c. 1920s. Gift of Evelyn McGrath

Two General Motors employees, Bruce Anderson and Davey Stuart, pose in front of a GM vehicle. General Motors of Canada was officially formed in 1918 and ten years later, the Oshawa GM plant employed 8,100 individuals. In the 1920s, a push for Canadian-built cars to be exported overseas resulted in a boom at GM. High British taxes on cars made in the United States did not extend to Canadian manufacturers, resulting in an increase in production and distribution.

General Motors Workers, c. 1920s. Gift of Evelyn McGrath

Two General Motors employees, Bruce Anderson and Davey Stuart, pose in front of a GM vehicle. General Motors of Canada was officially formed in 1918 and ten years later, the Oshawa GM plant employed 8,100 individuals.

In the 1920s, a push for Canadian-built cars to be exported overseas resulted in a boom at GM. High British taxes on cars made in the United States did not extend to Canadian manufacturers, resulting in an increase in production and distribution.

Town Hall, 1924

Located at Simcoe Street North and Richmond Street, Oshawa Town Hall is adorned with bunting and flags, bearing a sign saying “Welcome” for what is presumed to be the “Becoming a City” celebrations.

The growing popularity of the automotive industry resulted in an influx of Oshawa’s population, growing from 4,000 in 1915 to 15,545 in 1924. This allowed Oshawa to seek incorporation and on March 8, 1924, Oshawa received “City” status.

Town Hall, 1924

Located at Simcoe Street North and Richmond Street, Oshawa Town Hall is adorned with bunting and flags, bearing a sign saying “Welcome” for what is presumed to be the “Becoming a City” celebrations.

The growing popularity of the automotive industry resulted in an influx of Oshawa’s population, growing from 4,000 in 1915 to 15,545 in 1924. This allowed Oshawa to seek incorporation and on March 8, 1924, Oshawa received “City” status.

Industry boomed in Oshawa, particularly the auto industry, which encouraged a growth in population and infrastructure. In the 1920s, the population grew from 4,000 to 16,000, allowing for the incorporation of Oshawa as a city on March 8, 1924. Lakeview Park opened in 1920 as a public park for residents to enjoy and Memorial Park saw the dedication of the Cenotaph in 1924, remembering those lost in WWI. Meanwhile, Oshawa’s Sons of Temperance continued to advocate passionately for prohibition, but despite being popular during the war, prohibition was seen less favourably in the 1920s and ended in Ontario in 1927.  

While this exhibition depicts the past, it also reflects on today, 100 years removed from the people and moments depicted. Will this next decade similarly be “roaring” as the world responds to the isolation, losses and economic hardships of the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing social and political upheavals? Oshawa is already experiencing a rise in population through real estate development; is an industrial and economic boom to follow? Either way, it is clear that the 1920s was a period of growth and change in Oshawa, which contributed to shaping the city we know today. 


Traffic Signals at the Four Corners, 1920

Courtesy of the Oshawa Museum.

The Four Corners (Oshawa) bustles with activity as officer Ed Stauffer directs traffic with the manually operated traffic sign. It was not until 1924 that the first electric traffic lights were installed in Ontario.

Fire in Alger Block, 1927

A fire originated in the basement of the Biltmore Café on October 26, 1927. Despite firefighters fighting the blaze for several hours, damages on this city block were estimated at $90,000.

Fire in Alger Block, 1927

A fire originated in the basement of the Biltmore Café on October 26, 1927. Despite firefighters fighting the blaze for several hours, damages on this city block were estimated at $90,000.

Harmony Bridge Damaged by Flood, 1929

The washout of the Harmony bridge led to the tragic death of two people after heavy April downpours. A car with four people was driving back to Peterborough after attending the Boy Scout Troops performance at Rotary Hall on Centre Street. Due to the heavy rain, they decided to turn back around and spend the night in Oshawa. Unfortunately, they did not know that the Harmony bridge had washed-out and they plunged into the rushing river below. Two of the occupants miraculously survived.

Harmony Bridge Damaged by Flood, 1929

The washout of the Harmony bridge led to the tragic death of two people after heavy April downpours. A car with four people was driving back to Peterborough after attending the Boy Scout Troops performance at Rotary Hall on Centre Street. Due to the heavy rain, they decided to turn back around and spend the night in Oshawa. Unfortunately, they did not know that the Harmony bridge had washed-out and they plunged into the rushing river below. Two of the occupants miraculously survived.

Old Home Week Parade, 1924

The Oshawa Elks float in the Old Home Week parade is parked in front of the Y.M.C.A (51 Simcoe Street South), where registration and billeting for the parade took place.

Old Home Week was a traditional celebration that can best be described as a town reunion. In 1924, the celebration was much larger to acknowledge that Oshawa officially became a city in March of that year.
From left to right, back row: Jennie Isabella Walker, Helen Fowler, Madeline (Brown) Ward and Marjorie (Sprenthall) Elder. From left to right, front row: Marjorie Mary I. Sproule, Lorraine (Francis) Jones, Jean Hall, and an unidentified figure.

Old Home Week Parade, 1924

The Oshawa Elks float in the Old Home Week parade is parked in front of the Y.M.C.A (51 Simcoe Street South), where registration and billeting for the parade took place.

Old Home Week was a traditional celebration that can best be described as a town reunion. In 1924, the celebration was much larger to acknowledge that Oshawa officially became a city in March of that year.
From left to right, back row: Jennie Isabella Walker, Helen Fowler, Madeline (Brown) Ward and Marjorie (Sprenthall) Elder. From left to right, front row: Marjorie Mary I. Sproule, Lorraine (Francis) Jones, Jean Hall, and an unidentified figure.

Mike’s Place, 1924

A lineup of people waiting to buy hockey tickets stands in front of Mike’s Place at 17 King Street West. During the play-offs, the lines of people often extended to Centre Street. Mike’s Place, a convenience store today, has been a staple of downtown Oshawa since 1924.

Railway Employees, 1920

A group of workers pose in front of the Shunter. The Oshawa Railway Co. was established in 1895 and operated until 1964. A Shunter is a British term for small railroad locomotives used for maneuvering railroad cars within a railyard.

From left to right: unidentified, unidentified, Mothersill, McKnight(?), Mildred Fair, George Finigan, with Joe Fair leaning out of the window of the cab.

Oshawa Daily Times Night Staff, 1928

The night shift crew poses for a group portrait at the Oshawa Daily Times. On the left is Foreman Wm. Corbett. The Oshawa Daily Times was one of at least four newspapers circulating in Oshawa in the 1920s and was known at various times as the Oshawa Times or the Oshawa Times-Gazette before finally closing in 1994.

Regent Theatre, c. 1930

Courtesy of Oshawa Public Library.

Constructed on King Street in 1919, the Regent Theatre was designed by renowned Canadian theatre designer, J. McNee Jeffrey. The theatre was home to innovative features for its time, including an air conditioning system that consisted of fans blowing over blocks of ice to cool the large auditorium. This was replaced in the late 1920s by a system that pumped cold water through the building, which proved more effective.

The Regent Theatre was sold to the University of Ontario Institute of Technology in 2009 and has since undergone several reconstructive projects to breathe new life into the building while still maintaining the integrity of the theatre.

Woman Peering Through a Telescope, 1920

A woman peers through a telescope with a male companion. In the 1920s, astronomer Edwin Hubble discovered that there are countless galaxies that exist beyond the Milky Way through his Earth-bound telescope. Courtesy of the Oshawa Museum.

Ladies Softball Team at Alexandra Park, 1924

A lineup of young women pose in their softball uniforms at Alexandra Park on July 12, 1924. From right: Agnes Morgan, Jenny Morgan, Mabel Elliott, Kay Wells, Vivian Elliott, Florence Conlin, Jean Miles, Marg. Callaghan, Edith Truax, ______ Mallett. Gift of Bessie Morgan.

Cleveland Folder at the Oshawa Times, 1928

A young woman operates a “Cleveland Folder” machine at the Oshawa Times office. Newspaper sheets were fed into this machine, assembled and folded. This machine made folding large amounts of newspapers easy.

Bishop Bethune College Girls Hockey Team, c. 1925

Bishop Bethune College was a private day and boarding school for girls, located at the corner of Simcoe Street and Gibb Street. The school opened in 1889 and operated until 1932. During the winter months, rather than mandatory daily walks, a skating rink was built on site, resulting in the establishment of an ice hockey team.

The First City Council, 1924

This image is the official portrait of the first City Council after Oshawa became a city in 1924. From left to right, back row: City Clerk F.E. Hare, City Engineer W.C. Smith, Alderman E. Jackson. From left to right, middle row: Alderman O.M. Alger, R.C. Henry, George Hart, J.L. Whattam, R.D. Preston, T.J. Sheridan, A.J. Graves. From left to right, front row: Alderman John Stacey, Alderman E.L. Vickery, Mayor W.J. Trick, Alderman G.T. Morris, Alderman D.F. Johnston.

Rum Running During Prohibition, 1920

Constable George Parsons stands in his street clothes beside a rum running car that overheated and caught fire while travelling through Oshawa. The car was used to smuggle four hundred bottles of liquor illegally across the Quebec border. On scene investigations of the fire led to the discovery of hidden liquor in the hood of the car as seen to the right of Parsons. Later, the car was brought to the police station where another four hundred bottles were found in a compartment underneath the car. Both the car and the liquor were confiscated and its owner was charged and fined $800.

Prohibition in Canada came as a result of the Temperance Movement, which called for moderation or total abstinence from alcohol, based on the idea that alcohol was the cause of many of society’s ills. During this time, it was legal to produce liquor in Canada and export it from Canadian ports, however the sales of alcohol within Canadian borders was illegal. Prohibition became law during the First World War and was regarded by many as a patriotic duty and social sacrifice in the name of the war effort. The laws were repealed in Ontario in 1927 and the Liquor Control Act was established, however drinking in public establishments remained illegal for another seven years.

High Jump at a School Field Day, 1920

As the population of Oshawa continued to grow in the 1920s, new schools were built to accommodate. This Oshawa High School field day saw students and faculty gathering for a day of sports and recreation. Pictured is student George Jaimeson attempting to clear a high jump bar.

War Memorial, 1924

Sir William Mulock addresses the crowd at the official dedication of the War Memorial on November 10, 1924. The war memorial that stands today in Memorial Park is due to the efforts of Dr. T.E. Kaiser who, along with the memorial committee, undertook a massive fundraising drive to honour those who served in WWI. The memorial and the surrounding gardens is called “The Garden of the Unforgotten.”

Buck Greig and Sam Wilson, 1923

Friends Buck Grieg and Sam Wilson pose on the Toronto Eastern Railway Bridge on Bond Street, just west of McMillan Drive. Houses on the east side of McMillan Drive are seen in the background, as are a few houses on Bond Street.

Oshawa Switchboard, c. 1920

The first switchboard in Oshawa was installed in 1916; pictured here is the interior of the office with telephone operators at work.

Simcoe St. Methodist Church Mission Band, 1920

The Mission Band, a children’s Sunday school missionary society from Simcoe Street Methodist Church, poses for a group photo at their picnic at Lakeview Park.

Group Gathered for Chapman’s Auto Parade, c. 1929

 

A group of men, women, and children stand outside of a building, possibly Roger’s Batteryless Radio Sales and Service at 17 Church (Centre) Street. Chapman’s Auto, who sponsored the parade, was located directly across the street from these businesses, at 16 Church Street. Courtesy of the Oshawa Public Library.

McLaughlin Employees of 20 Years’ Service, 1924

By 1928, 10% of the 8,100 workers employed by GM had been there for over ten years. Half of the individuals in administrative roles had worked for GM for over twenty years, dating back to the McLaughlin Carriage days. Most of the individuals are identified.

Regent Theatre Cast, 1922

Cast of a Cecil B. DeMille production at the Regent Theatre. Cecil B. DeMille is regarded by many as a founding father of American cinema, as well as the most commercially successful producer-director in film history. Courtesy of the Oshawa Museum.

Columbus Ladies Methodist Aid, 1926

Courtesy of The Oshawa Museum.

Teachers at South Simcoe Street School, 1926

South Simcoe Street School opened in 1925 at 505 Simcoe Street South. In 1999, the school merged with E.A. Lovell to create Village Union School, located at the corner of Centre and Gibb Street. Courtesy of The Oshawa Museum.

Interior View with Unidentified Woman, c. 1920

This interior image with an unidentified woman offers a glimpse into 1920s fashion and home décor. Courtesy of The Oshawa Museum.

Buffalo at Lakeview Park, 1922

Courtesy of Oshawa Public Library.

In the early 1920s, an application was submitted to the Minister of the Interior to request the loan of three buffalo for Lakeview Park. George W. McLaughlin first proposed a zoo for Lakeview Park and agreed to cover all expenses related to the relocation and transportation of the buffalo. The buffalo ended up coming from Buffalo Park in Wainwright, Alberta.

The buffalo remained at Lakeview Park until August 20, 1931, when they were relocated to Riverdale Zoo in Toronto due to residents’ complaints about their appearance and smell. When they were being moved, one briefly escaped its crate and galloped up Simcoe Street, scattering the crowd and nearly injuring a bystander.

This exhibition is part of a Cultural Tourism Initiative presented in partnership with the Pickering Museum Village, the Canadian Automotive Museum, Parkwood Estates, and Central Counties Tourism. To see more War on Whiskey programming visit the Temperance and Temptation website!

Nurses Exhibition: A Profession of Care

A Profession of Care: A History of Oshawa General Hospital’s School of Nursing

During this global pandemic, nurses are needed more than ever. They are essential workers in our health care system whose courage and dedication should be celebrated during normal times, let alone in the midst of the current crisis. Created in partnership with the Oshawa Public Libraries and the Oshawa Museum, this exhibition looks back at Oshawa’s history of training nurses, through the Oshawa General Hospital School of Nursing, to salute healthcare workers everywhere and celebrate their exceptional skills.The Oshawa General Hospital School of Nursing was established shortly after the first hospital building opened in 1910.

During this time, hospital-based nursing schools were opening across Canada. Demand was high for new nurses and the brochures advertising the schools would specifically target young women, often outlining requirements for entry such as, “women of superior education and culture.”

The three-year program at Oshawa General Hospital had its first three graduates in 1913, with the graduation ceremony held at the Oshawa High School (today O’Neill Collegiate & Vocational Institute), a tradition that continued for many years. Life in the early years of the training program was arduous—twelve-hour shifts, seven days a week, with four hours of free time on Sundays. Since there were no tuition fees, students were expected to fully integrate into hospital life, supporting doctors and patients around the clock. Beginning with classroom training, students would then get hands-on experience working alongside doctors and nurses with patients from various departments such as maternity, surgical and pediatric.

The first students’ residence was composed of a few small rooms in the attic of the hospital. Later, a residence was built at 47 Alexandra Street that had a capacity to house forty nursing students. The school grew in the 1920s, which led to the need to fundraise for an addition to the residence. A campaign in 1922, led by the Women’s Auxiliary, raised $15,000 to build 10 more rooms.

In the 1940s, enrollment continued to increase, and the school was in desperate need of more space. Colonel and Mrs. R.S. McLaughlin donated the funds to build a new nurses’ residence. In November of 1947, McLaughlin Hall opened and was described as being among the finest of its kind in Canada. It was also during this period that new educational requirements for enrollment were established, including Secondary School Diploma credits in mathematics and sciences.More renovations were needed in the 1960s to further accommodate the growing school.

The basement of the Oshawa General Hospital, known as the “A Wing” became the new School of Nursing. In addition, the Minister of Health for Ontario changed all three-year nursing programs to two years in order to meet the demand for nursing professionals and began to experiment with standardized curriculum. Hospitals were reluctant to make changes to the programs as each hospital had individualized training programs, and were used to the reliable and inexpensive workers.

As healthcare technology advanced, nursing schools had to adapt. In 1973, the Ontario Government closed hospital-based nursing schools and shifted training to college or university-based programs. As a result of the changes, Oshawa General Hospital’s School of Nursing closed and the program was transferred to Durham College.

In its 60-year history, the Oshawa General Hospital School of Nursing had 1,198 graduates. Throughout the years, the school grew and evolved to keep up with the ever-changing healthcare system and contributed greatly to the community’s overall healthcare services. This exhibition celebrates our local history and is a small gesture to honour the incredible work our current healthcare workers do everyday.

Oshawa General Hospital, 1911

Oshawa General Hospital, 1911
The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Oshawa General Hospital, 1911
The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Two nurses are seen on the front steps of the first Oshawa General McKay is standing beside an automobile owned by Dr. Rundle.

Oshawa General Hospital Staff, 1912

Oshawa General Hospital Staff, 1912
The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Oshawa General Hospital Staff, 1912
The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Photograph of the first Medical Board & Nursing Staff at the Oshawa General Hospital. All are identified.
Left to right, first card: Drs. Rundle, Hoig, Kaiser, Bolt, McKay
Second card: Drs. Ford, Finnigan, Walker, Carmichael
Third card: Nurses Drew, Selling, Scott, Oliver, Kett, MacWilliams (Lady Superintendent), Russell, Vernon, Cheesman

Oshawa General Hospital Nurses, 1912

Oshawa General Hospital Nurses, 1912
The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Oshawa General Hospital Nurses, 1912
The Thomas Bouckley Collection

View of a group of nurses seated on the verandah at the Oshawa General Hospital. All are identified.
Back card, left to right: Misses Vernon, Drew, Scott, Oliver, Kett and Cheeseman.
Front card, left to right: Misses Vernon, McWilliams (Lady Superintendent), Seiling

What is a Student Nurse?

“Student nurses are to be found everywhere, underneath, on top of, running around, jumping over or slithering past patients’ beds…” – Unknown, 1963 Year Book

Student nurses are to be found everywhere, underneath, on top of, running around, jumping over or slithering past patients’ beds. Doctors overlook them, mothers worry about them and patients love them.

A student nurse is courage under a cap, a smile in snowy white, strength in starched skirts, energy that is endless, the best of young womanhood, a modern Florence Nightingale. Just when she is gaining poise and prestige, she drops a glass, breaks a syringe or steps on a doctor’s foot.

A student nurse is a composite. She eats like a team of hungry interns and works like the whole nursing staff put together. She has the speed of a gazelle, the strength of an ox, the quickness of a cat and the endurance of a flagpole sitter. To the head nurse she has the stability of mush, the fleetness of a snail, the mentality of a mule and is held together by starch, adhesive tape and strained nerves. To an alumnus, she will never work as hard, carry more trays, make more beds or scrub on more cases than her predecessors.

A student nurse likes days off, boys her own age, the O.R., affiliations, certain doctors, pretty clothes, her roommate and Mom and Dad. She is not much on working 3-11, days off with classes, alarm clocks, getting up for roll call or eating corned beef every Tuesday.

A student nurse is a wonderful creature. You can criticize her but you can’t make her quit. Might as well admit it, whether you are a head nurse, doctor, alumnus or patient, she is your personal representatives of the hospital, your living symbol of faith and sympathetic care.

Author Unknown, 1963 Year Book

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1915

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1915
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2406

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1915
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2406

The woman at the back, Miss MacWilliams, was the Lady Superintendent of Oshawa General Hospital for over ten years. She was in charge of the nurses-in-training program. In the Oshawa General Hospital: A Short History, it describes the position as: “The Lady Superintendent….shall have control, subject to the Board of Directors, of the Oshawa General Hospital and shall instruct Nurses or cause them to be instructed in the art of nursing.”

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1925

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1925
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2888

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1925
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2888

Miss MacWilliams, the Lady Superintendent of the Nursing School, stands on the right of the 1925 graduating class.

Maternity Ward, c. 1920

Maternity Ward, c. 1920
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2870

Maternity Ward, c. 1920
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2870

Group of nurses holding newborns in the maternity ward. The nurses in the training program received hands-on experience working in various departments of the hospital, including maternity and surgical.

Night Supervisor with Students, c. 1920

Night Supervisor with Students, c. 1920
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2362

Night Supervisor with Students, c. 1920
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2362

Nurse Dryden (Night Supervisor) posing with two nursing students, Miss Shearer and Miss Drimmie, outside the hospital.

Students cutting surgical dressings, c. 1925-28

Students cutting surgical dressings, c. 1925-28
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2356

Students cutting surgical dressings, c. 1925-28
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2356

Two nursing students, Miss McCohn and Miss Hutchison, making dressings in the surgical wing of the hospital.

Off Duty Nursing Students, c. 1920

Off Duty Nursing Students, c. 1920
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2355

Off Duty Nursing Students, c. 1920
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2355

After coming off duty from the night shift, two nursing students, Miss Hinton and Miss Thompson, have some fun fooling around on the grandstand at Alexandra Park.

Nursing School Staff, 1928

Nursing School Staff, 1928
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2357

Nursing School Staff, 1928
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2357

Nursing school staff, including Lady Superintendent Miss McWilliams (fourth from left) posing outside in formal gowns.

Nursing School Cafeteria, c. 1940

Nursing School Cafeteria, c. 1940
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2872

Nursing School Cafeteria, c. 1940
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2872

The nurses-in-training lived in residences on the hospital grounds. As the school grew, so did the need for most residence space. This cafeteria is believed to have been located in McLaughlin Hall, a state-of-the-art facility at the time.

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1951
Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1951. Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2427
By the 1950s, admission to the Nursing School had greatly increased. These graduates pose outside of Oshawa High School (today O’Neil Collegiate & Vocational Institute). The photograph was taken by Campbell’s Studio, based in Oshawa.
Nursing Students at Hospital, c. 1960

Collection of the Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2244


Nursing Students at Hospital, c. 1960
Collection of the Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2244

View from behind a group of nursing students posing for a photo outside the hospital.

McLaughlin Hall, Nursing residence, c. 1960

McLaughlin Hall, Nursing residence, c. 1960
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2403

McLaughlin Hall, Nursing residence, c. 1960
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2403

Built in 1946 as a result of a donation by Mr. and Mrs. R. S. McLaughlin, this nurses’ residence was officially opened in November of that year. Its original address was 362 Simcoe Street North, which is now 1 Hospital Court. The building is currently used for the administrative offices of Lakeridge Health Oshawa.

Alexandra House, Nurses Residence, c. 1920

Alexandra House, Nurses Residence, c. 1920
The Thomas Bouckley Collection

Alexandra House, Nurses Residence, c. 1920
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2403

View from Alexandra Park of the Alexandra House nurses’ residence and the water tower that was located on the south-west corner of Alexandra St. and Simcoe St. North. The board fence in the middle of the photo marks the edge of the park property. Alexandra House was built in 1915 as a nurses’ residence. An expansion was built in 1932 to provide accommodation for 40 nurses. The water tower was removed in the late thirties or early forties. A new nurses’ residence was built by Mr. and Mrs. R. S. McLaughlin on the site in the 1940s.

Oshawa General Hospital School of Nursing Student Nursing Uniform, c. 1960

Oshawa General Hospital School of Nursing
Student Nursing Uniform, c. 1960
Oshawa Museum Collection, 012.5.2

Oshawa General Hospital School of Nursing Student Nursing Uniform, c. 1960
Oshawa Museum Collection, 012.5.2

This student nursing uniform belonged to Miss G. Gorsline when she attended the School of Nursing in Oshawa. Comprised of a blue and white pinstriped cotton dress with a white bib and apron. The uniform also included starched stiff white cuffs and a collar, white stockings and white shoes. There were strict rules regarding a nurse’s appearance in uniform. Student nurses were only allowed to wear their complete uniform while on duty or during classroom lectures.

Award Winners, 1968

Award Winners, 1968
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2313


Award Winners, 1968
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2313

Award winners of the class of 1968 pose with rose bouquets outside.

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1962

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1962
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2426

Oshawa General Hospital Nursing Class of 1962
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2426

Operating Room in Oshawa General Hospital, c. 1940s

Operating Room in Oshawa General Hospital, c. 1940s
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2871

Operating Room in Oshawa General Hospital, c. 1940s
Collection of Oshawa Public Libraries, LH 2871

Nursing students received a well-rounded education by assisting and learning from doctors and nurses from various departments. Seen here is the Surgical Department.


Oshawa General Hospital, Nurses Station, Children's Ward, 1962

Oshawa Museum Collection, A984.4.12

Oshawa General Hospital, Nurses Station, Children’s Ward, 1962
Oshawa Museum Collection, A984.4.12

This photo appeared in a 1962 brochure about Oshawa General Hospital’s new Sykes Wing. It depicts the Children’s Floor that had 88 beds exclusively for children. In the brochure it says: “Sick children need comfort and assurance. More than ever they require love and affection…a feeling of security and a faith that they will be guided back to health by the tender care of their nurse and professional skill of the doctor.”


Nursery, Sykes Wing, 1962

Nursery, Sykes Wing, 1962
Oshawa Museum Collection, A984.4.12

Nursery, Sykes Wing, 1962
Oshawa Museum Collection, A984.4.12

This image appeared in a brochure launching the official opening of the new Sykes Wing. The Sykes Wing featured a large nursery and children’s ward.


Recovery Room, Oshawa General Hospital, 1973

Recovery Room, Oshawa General Hospital, 1973
Oshawa Museum Collection, A984.4.12

Recovery Room, Oshawa General Hospital, 1973
Oshawa Museum Collection, A984.4.12

Despite the closure of the hospital-based nursing school and the transfer of the program to Durham College, students still received clinical experiences at Oshawa General Hospital in the program. This photo appeared in a brochure celebrating the official opening of the “G” Wing on October 10, 1973. The caption above the photograph says: “Constant watch in the Recovery Room.”


Bedside Nursing, Oshawa General Hospital, 1973. Oshawa Museum Collection, A984.4.12

Bedside Nursing, Oshawa General Hospital, 1973
Oshawa Museum Collection, A984.4.12

Despite the closure of the hospital-based nursing school and the transfer of the program to Durham College, students still received clinical experiences at Oshawa General Hospital in the program. This photo appeared in a brochure celebrating the official opening of the “G” Wing on October 10, 1973 with the caption: “Tender care is part of bedside nursing.”


Online exhibition designed by Computer Programmer Analyst students, Dhara Savaliya and Damilola Sanusi.

This online exhibition was created in partnership with Oshawa Public Libraries and the Oshawa Museum.




The Wandering Line

Drawings from the Permanent Collection

Drawing is one of the oldest forms of human expression, predating the written word. It has long been considered a fundamental part of visual art education due to its exploratory nature that allows artists to experiment and refine their artistic practice. Pulling together a selection of drawings and sketches from the Permanent Collection, this exhibition offers insight into the artists’ process and presents an opportunity to celebrate these sometimes overlooked works as artworks in their own right.

The portability of drawings and sketchbooks has made it a great method for observing the world. In Yvonne McKague Housser’s Walking with a Sketchbook, Mexico (n.d.), as the title suggests, the artist traveled with her sketchbook to capture her views and experiences. Another example is A.Y. Jackson’s Close-up Study of Rocky Shore with Puddle (n.d.), a double-sided sketch, which, based on the ring holes along the side, once lived in a sketchbook.

A.Y. Jackson (Canadian, 1882 – 1974), Close-up Study of Rocky Shore with Puddle, n.d., graphite on paper. Gift of Naomi Jackson Groves, 1992.

Some of the drawings in this exhibition are examples of artists exploring the human form. Anatomical studies were common for artists to practice and refine their ability to depict the human body. Two precise and very different examples are William Blair Bruce’s more scientific drawing of the tendons in the arm in Untitled (Anatomical Studies) (n.d.), and F.S. Coburn’s Power (1891), in which he uses charcoal to get the definition of muscles and veins through shading. These types of sketches demonstrate the medium’s ability to help artists’ further study, experiment, and improve techniques.

While some of the works in this exhibition are examples of quick drawing exercises, others are preparations for paintings and prints, called studies. Take for example, Isabel McLaughlin’s Sketch for Tree (c. 1935), which is the study for a large painting that is in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada entitled Tree (1935). McLaughlin did many preparatory sketches for this painting, but this one clearly shows the decisive approach that she ended up using for the final painting.

Isabel McLaughlin (Canadian, 1903-2002), Sketch for Tree, c. 1935, charcoal on paper. Gift of the estate of Isabel McLaughlin, 2003.

Arthur Lismer (Canadian, b. England, 1885 – 1969), Study for The Happy Isles, c.1924, charcoal on paper. Gift of Charles Goldhamer, 1984.

Arthur Lismer’s Study for Happy Isles (c. 1934) is another example of a sketch in preparation for a large canvas now in the collection of the University of Saskatchewan. It shows how Lismer structured and planned the composition and spacing of the painting. The study depicts Georgian Bay, affectionately referred to as Happy Isles, and captures Lismer’s interest in detailed foregrounds with the figures on the dock.

Drawing from both life and their imagination, artists use the medium to explore and experiment. As artist Paul Klee once said: “A drawing is simply a line going for a walk.” The artworks included in this exhibition take us on a journey with the artist and show how drawings are not just simply a step in the creative process, but can be enjoyed as individual artworks in and of themselves.

Arthur Lismer (Canadian, b. England, 1885 – 1969), Fox Terrier, c. 1942, conte on paper. Gift of Isabel McLaughlin, 1989.

F.S. Coburn (Canadian, 1871 – 1960), The Actress , n.d., conte and coloured crayon on paper. Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988.

Lawren S. Harris (1885 – 1970), Abstract Drawing No. 525, n.d., graphite on paper. Gift of Harold Shenkman, 1987.

Charles A. Winter (1869 – 1942), Group of Character Sketches (from the John Gordon Portfolio), 1897, ink and graphite on paper. Gift of the heirs of the Hortense Gordon estate, 1976.

Clarence Gagnon (1881- 1942), Nude Study No. 2, 1903, conte on paper. Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988.

Ozias Leduc (Canadian, 1864 – 1955), Untitled, n.d.,
graphite on paper, laid down. Purchase, 2002.

F.S. Coburn (Canadian, 1871 – 1960), Power, 1891, charcoal on paper. Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988.

Edwin Holgate (Canadian, 1892 – 1977), Air Mechanic at Kenley, ink wash, 1943, graphite and conte on paper. Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988.

John Gould (Canadian, 1929-2010), Untitled, c.1980, ink on paper. Gift of Kay Kritzwiser, 1994.

Arthur Lismer (Canadian, b. England, 1885 – 1969), Study for The Happy Isles, c.1924, charcoal on paper. Gift of Charles Goldhamer, 1984.

Florence Vale (Canadian, b. England, 1909), Arguing Over Music, 1978, pen and ink on paper. Gift of Kay Kritzwiser, 1994.

William Blair Bruce (Canadian, 1859 – 1906), Untitled (anatomical studies), n.d., pen and ink on paper. Purchased with the assistance of the Government of Canada through the Cultural Property Export and Import Act, 1986.

A.Y. Jackson (Canadian, 1882 – 1974), Close-up Study of Rocky Shore with Puddle, n.d., graphite on paper. Gift of Naomi Jackson Groves, 1992.

Bobs Cogill Haworth (1900 – 1988), Old Chair, Quebec, n.d., graphite on paper. Gift of Isabel McLaughlin, 1989.

Paul Caron (Canadian, 1874 – 1941), Study of Tree Shadows on a Wall, 1931, graphite and ink on paper. Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988.

Robert Ross (Canadian, b. 1902), untitled (portrait study of a woman), 1939, charcoal on paper. Gift of Pauline Ross, 1991.

William Blair Bruce (Canadian, 1859 – 1906), Sketch for “Bathers at Capri”, n.d., graphite on paper. Purchased with the assistance of the Government of Canada through the Cultural Property Export.

Henrietta Shore (American, b. Canada, 1880 – 1963), Transfer drawing for sketch of “Magnolia”, c.1925/30, pencil and coloured pencil on paper. Purchase, 1994.

Yvonne McKague Housser (Canadian, 1897-1996), Tired Dancers, 1950, conte and graphite on paper. Gift of W. Ross Murray, 1977.

Isabel McLaughlin (Canadian, 1903-2002), Sketch for Tree, c. 1935, charcoal on paper. Gift of the estate of Isabel McLaughlin, 2003. Sketch for a painting in the National Gallery of Canada’s collection.

Miller Brittain (Canadian, 1912 – 1968), Female Head I, 1955, conte on paper. Anonymous gift, 1978.

Yvonne McKague Housser (Canadian, 1897 – 1996), Walking with a Sketchbook–Mexico, n.d., ink on paper. Gift of J.V. McKague, 1995.

Ray Mead (Canadian, b. England, 1921-1998), Untitled, pen, n.d., ink on paper. Gift of the Estate of Ray Mead, 1999.

Michaele Jordana Berman (Canadian, b.1947), In Chains, 1975-76, graphite on paper. Purchase, 1977.

Dani Crosby: Caregiving

We recently partnered with Dani Crosby Art on a community engagement activity in celebration of caregivers, inspired by one of our current online exhibitions, A Profession of Care. In this activity, Dani asked our audience to contribute short stories and thoughts on caregivers and the act of care giving, based on a series of writing prompts.

These stories have been collected and turned into portraits by the artist in which she has visually honoured, represented, and acknowledged the qualities and experiences of caregivers of all types. We would like to thank all those who contributed their incredibly moving and personal stories to this project.

Beginning on May 22, 2020, we will slowly reveal each of the five artworks that Dani has created and post it here on this page, as well as on our social media channels.

The artworks are available for FREE as a digital download, so please feel free to print a copy for yourself or keep a digital copy. If you would like to share the digital copy online, please ensure that proper credit is given to the artist. 

Artwork #1

Caregivers: Art Therapists/Therapists

“Art therapists and therapists give us permission and a safe space to reveal ourselves, our experiences, to untangle, to give a name to our demons and learn to live with them. They help us bring ourselves to a point of functionality where we can perform within our individual roles in a healthy and positive way. They teach us positive outlets for difficult emotions and memories. They teach us how to process experiences. We do the work. They work with us. They show us how that very hard, very important work can be done. Often that work goes unseen. That time we spend working on ourselves does not necessarily look like ‘productivity’ by broad societal standards. That time we spend working on ourselves does not always produce or present in a way that is immediately recognized. It’s not a marketable product or the ability to provide labour to a company. It is time spent growing a person, becoming the version of yourself you want to become. It gives us the tools we need to move through and contribute to different spaces and relationships: a classroom, a workplace, family bonds, friendships, platonic and romantic partnerships. If we so choose. Art Therapists and Therapists see us and help us look at ourselves until we can do so with acceptance or perhaps love instead of shame or perhaps anger.”

Artwork #2

Caregivers: Nurses

“These images were inspired not only by stories of and from Nurses but also PSWs, Paramedics, Doctors and other medical professionals. I read all of the stories sent to me by my community. I read local articles being written about medical professionals before and during the time of COVID19. I read many social media posts by individuals in our community talking about the current and broader experiences of our medical professionals. The medical professionals I connected with both directly and indirectly give so much, risk so much, each and every day.”

Artwork #3

Caregivers: Nurses

“They provide emotional care as well as physical care to their patients. They are with their patients through their worst, back to their best, into and past their final moments. They are the messengers of the good news and the news no one wants to give or receive. They maintain composure in the face of chaos, they push past their limits and work through conditions where proper support and resources are not made available. They are with us while we are at our most vulnerable and treat us with the dignity we all deserve, at all stages through our life and into our decline. Their chosen path puts them at great risk and provides them with great joy. It is a balancing act, a struggle, a calling, a role which benefits our society immensely. May we acknowledge and honour their importance during and beyond our moments of shared and individual crisis.”

Artwork #4

Caregivers: Teachers

“This image represents the cyclical flow of energy in the classroom. The constant giving of one’s self to students, the return of that energy and the struggle to reach all students. Each student had a unique personality, unique needs, unique personal circumstances. There is a need for hyper awareness and sensitivity to the impact words and actions might have on a student, each and every day. This image focuses on teachers who work with young children. But the challenges and joys illustrated here can be applied to teachers who work with any age group. Teachers extend themselves within and beyond their limits to maintain balance in the classroom, and between all the various roles in their lives. Students learn from their teachers, from each other, and teachers are constantly learning from their students. Each participant in a classroom grows together and leaves the classroom each day better equipped to navigate their own lives and participate the world around them.”

Artwork #5

Caregivers: Family and Friends

“Family are Parents, Mothers and Fathers, Siblings, Sisters, Brothers, Cousins, Aunts, Uncles, Grandparents, Grandmas, Grandpas, partners, and friends. Family can be born into and family can be chosen. Family can be people we meet in person and in the virtual world. Family are the people who help us grow, accept us, protect us, nurture and love us.

The nude figure in the upper middle of the image represents vulnerability, need, and growth as a result of personal determination and the support from family. The figures surrounding them represent all of the people in their family. May we all find the family we deserve.”